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The House of the Seven Gables

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Introduction: The HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES. IN September of the year during the February of which Hawthorne had completed ?The Scarlet Letter,? he began ?The House of the Seven Gables.? Meanwhile, he had removed from Salem to Lenox, in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, where he occupied with his family a small red wooden house, still standing at the date of this edition, near the Stockbridge Bowl. ?I sha'n't have the new story ready by November,? he explained to his publ...

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Catherine de Medici

By: Honoré de Balzac

When we think of the enormous number of volumes that have been published on the question as to where Hannibal crossed the Alps, without our being able to decide to-day whether it was (according to Whittaker and Rivaz) by Lyon, Geneva, the Great Saint-Bernard, and the valley of Aosta; or (according to Letronne, Follard, Saint-Simon and Fortia d'Urbano) by the Isere, Grenoble, Saint- Bonnet, Monte Genevra, Fenestrella, and the Susa passage; or (according to Larauza) by the...

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Hopalong Cassidy's Rustler Roundup (Bar20)

By: Clarence Edward Mulford

Excerpt: Buckskin. The town lay sprawled over half a square mile of alkali plain, its main Street depressing in its width, for those who were responsible for its inception had worked with a generosity born of the knowledge that they had at their immediate and unchallenged disposal the broad lands of Texas and New Mexico on which to assemble a grand total of twenty buildings, four of which were of wood. As this material was scarce, and had to be brought from where the wat...

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Selections from the Table Talk of Martin Luther

By: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Introduction: Martin Luther died on the 18th of February, 1546, and the first publication of his ?Table Talk??Tischreden?by his friend, Johann Goldschmid (Aurifaber), was in 1566, in a substantial folio. The talk of Luther was arranged, according to its topics, into eighty chapters, each with a minute index of contents. The whole work in a complete octavo edition, published at Stuttgart and Leipzig in 1836, occupies 1,390 closely printed pages, equivalent to 2,780 pages,...

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The Wheel of Time

By: Henry James

And your daughter? said Lady Greyswood; tell me about her. She must be nice. Oh, yes, she's nice enough. She's a great comfort. MrsKnocker hesitated a moment, then she went on: Unfortunately she's not good-looking — not a bit. That doesn't matter, when they're not ill-natured, rejoined, insincerely, Lady Greyswood, who had the remains of great beauty. Oh, but poor Fanny is quite extraordinarily plain. I assure you it does matter. She knows it herself; she suffers from it...

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History of the Christian Church, Vol. I. Apostolic Christianity

By: Philip Schaff

I have also brought the literature up to date, and corrected a few printing errors, so that this issue may be called a revised edition. A learned and fastidious German critic and professional church historian has pronounced this work to be far in advance of any German work in the fullness of its digest of the discoveries and researches of the last thirty years. (Theolog. Literatur-Zeitung, for March 22, 1884.) But the Bryennios discovery, and the extensive literature whi...

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The Ghost of Lin San Fu

By: Clifford Goodrich

Excerpt: THE venerable merchants put their heads close together. Their tones were guarded, furtive. ?It is to be hoped,? the first one breathed, ?that the spirit of Lin San Fu will follow his mortal flesh.? His companion?s straggly beard hobbled in animation. ?Aiee!? he agreed, in a voice filled with fear.? It is most earnestly to be hoped! It belongs in the ancestral land.? Both, then, looked anxiously behind them, padded off into the night of China Hill. Behind them, a...

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The Poetical Works of O.W. Holmes, Volume 11

By: Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.

Excerpt: ?WHO gave this cup?? The secret thou wouldst steal Its brimming flood forbids it to reveal: No mortal?s eye shall read it till he first Cool the red throat of thirst. If on the golden floor one draught remain, Trust me, thy careful search will be in vain; Not till the bowl is emptied shalt thou know The names enrolled below. Deeper than Truth lies buried in her well Those modest names the graven letters spell Hide from the sight; but wait, and thou shalt see Who the good angels be ...

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Ambassador Morgenthau's Story

By: Henry Morgenthau

Preface: By this time the American people have probably become convinced that the Germans deliberately planned the conquest of the world. Yet they hesitate to convict on circumstantial evidence and for this reason all eye witnesses to this, the greatest crime in modern history, should volunteer their testimony. I have therefore laid aside any scruples I had as to the propriety of disclosing to my fellow countrymen the facts which I learned while representing them in Turk...

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The Bracelets

By: Maria Edgeworth

Excerpt: In a beautiful and retired part of England lived Mrs. Villars, a lady whose accurate understanding, benevolent heart, and steady temper, peculiarly fitted her for the most difficult, as well as most important of all occupations?the education of youth. This task she had undertaken; and twenty young persons were put under her care, with the perfect confidence of their parents. No young people could be happier; they were good and gay, emulous, but not envious of ea...

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The Bliss of Solitude

By: Dorothy Canfield

Excerpt: THE last time I came from Europe, although I was supposed to be in charge of my pretty young niece, I did not appear on deck until the last day of the voyage. I was tired, and I knew that Puss had plenty of acquaintances on board. She is the soft?eyed, appealing, helpless sort of girl who is always looked after. When I finally ascended to the upper world, I was, therefore, both surprised and remorseful to find her looking troubled and almost distressed.

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The Mysterious Mr. I

By: Harry Stephen Keeler

Excerpt: Whether sizing up the windows, and the building containing them, of the stingiest, greediest surgeon?at least so I had gathered!?in all Chicago; the man who?as I?d also gathered!?could outbargain 4 Scotchmen and 20 Armenians?would give me any clue as to the outcome of any dealings with him, was problematical, perhaps. But?lo and behold!?that operation was to reveal something almost as valuable: MacLeish MacPherson was actually in his offices at this outlandish h...

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Was It an Illusion a Parson's Story

By: Amelia B. Edwards

The facts which I am about to relate happened to myself some sixteen or eighteen years ago, at which time I served Her Majesty as an Inspector of Schools. Now, the Provincial Inspector is perpetually on the move; and I was still young enough to enjoy a life of constant travelling. There are, indeed, many less agreeable ways in which an unbeneficed parson may contrive to scorn delights and live laborious days. In remote places where strangers are scarce, his annual visit ...

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English Traits

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

I have been twice in England. In 1833, on my return from a short tour in Sicily, Italy, and France, I crossed from Boulogne, and landed in London at the Tower stairs. It was a dark Sunday morning; there were few people in the streets; and I remember the pleasure of that first walk on English ground, with my companion, an American artist, from the Tower up through Cheapside and the Strand, to a house in Russell Square, whither we had been recommended to good chambers. For...

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Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature

By: August Wilhelm Schlegel

Excerpt: ?Were I to pray for a taste which should stand me in stead under every variety of circumstances, and be a source of happiness and cheerfulness to me during life, and a shield against its ills, however things might go amiss and the world frown upon me, it would he a taste for reading... Give a man this taste, and the means of gratifying it, and you can hardly fail of making him a happy man; unless, indeed, you put into his hands a most perverse selection of Books...

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Daedalus

By: J.B.S. Haldane

Excerpt: I have slightly expanded certain parts of this paper since reading it. It has therefore probably lost any unity which it may once have possessed. It will be criticized for its undue emphasis on certain unpleasant topics. This is necessary if people are to be induced to think about them, and it is the whole business of a university teacher to induce people to think.

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Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo : Volume 2

By: Sir Richard Francis Burton

Chapter I. From Fernando Po to Loango Bay. -- the German Expedition. During the hot season of 1863, Nanny Po, as the civilized African calls this lofty and beautiful island, had become a charnel-house, a dark and dismal tomb of Europeans. The yellow fever of the last year, which wiped out in two months one-third of the white colony -- more exactly, 78 out of 250 -- had not reappeared, but the conditions for its re-appearance were highly favourable. The earth was all wate...

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The Passion of the Holy Martyrs Perpetua and Felicitas

By: Tertullian, Christian Theologian of Carthage

Excerpt: THE PASSION OF THE HOLY MARTYRS PERPETUA AND FELICITAS. Preface.[1] IF ancient illustrations of faith which both testify to God?s grace and tend to man?s edification are collected in writing, so that by the perusal of them, as if by the reproduction of the facts, as well God may be honoured, as man may be strengthened; why should not new instances be also collected, that shall be equally suitable for both purposes, if only on the ground that these modern example...

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The Inca of Perusalem

By: George Bernard Shaw

Prologue: The tableau curtains are closed. An English archdeacon comes through them in a condition of extreme irritation. He speaks through the curtains to someone behind them. The ARCHDEACON. Once for all, Ermyntrude, I cannot afford to maintain you in your present extravagance. [He goes to a flight of steps leading to the stalls and sits down disconsolately on the top step. A fashionably dressed lady comes through the curtains and contemplates him with patient obstinac...

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The Bride

By: Samuel Rowlands

Introduction: When the complete works of Samuel Rowlands were issued by the Hunterian Club in 1872?1880, in an edition of two hundred and ten copies, the Editor was obliged to omit from the collection the poem entitled ?The Bride.? No copy of this tract was supposed to be extant. Twenty years later, in the article on Rowlands in the Dictionary of National Biography, Mr. Sidney Lee also names this poem as one of the author?s lost works. All that was known of it was the en...

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