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John Bull in America; Or, The New Munchausen

By: James Kirke Paulding

Preface: OF THE EDITOR. On the fifth day of August, 1824, a rather genteel looking stranger arrived at the Mansion Hotel in the city of Washington, where he inquired for a retired room, and expressed his intention of staying some time. He was dressed in a blue frock, striped vest, and gray pantaloons; was about five feet ten, as is supposed, and had a nose like a potato. The evening of the following day there arrived in the stage from Baltimore, a little mahogany?faced f...

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The Noble Koran (Quran) : The Ant

By: Transcribed by the Prophet Muhammad

Excerpt: 027.001 Ta. Sin. These are revelations of the Qur'an and a Scripture that maketh plain; 027.002 A guidance and good tidings for believers 027.003 Who establish worship and pay the poor?due and are sure of the Hereafter. 027.004 Lo! as for those who believe not in the Hereafter, We have made their works fairseeming unto them so that they are all astray. 027.005 Those are they for whom is the worst of punishment, and in the Hereafter they will be the greatest lose...

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Quetzal

By: Maxwell Grant

THERE were five passengers aboard the silver-hued plane that was droning westward across the California desert. All were persons who had boarded the ship at Phoenix, Arizona, for direct flight to San Diego. More than an hour out of Phoenix, the sky liner had passed over Yuma, where a muddy ribbon represented the lower stretch of the Colorado River. Twenty-odd minutes had passed since Yuma. At its present clip the plane should be close to El Centro, north of the Mexican border.

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Counsels and Maxims

By: Arthur Schopenhauer

Excerpt: If my object in these pages were to present a complete scheme of counsels and maxims for the guidance of life, I should have to repeat the numerous rules?some of them excellent?which have been drawn up by thinkers of all ages, from Theognis and Solomon[1] down to La Rochefoucauld; and, in so doing, I should inevitably entail upon the reader a vast amount of well?worn commonplace. But the fact is that in this work I make still less claim to exhaust my subject tha...

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The Economic Consequences of the Peace

By: John Maynard Keynes

The power to become habituated to his surroundings is a marked characteristic of mankind. Very few of us realise with conviction the intensely unusual, unstable, complicated, unreliable, temporary nature of the economic organisation by which Western Europe has lived for the last half century. We assume some of the most peculiar and temporary of our late advantages as natural, permanent, and to be depended on, and we lay our plans accordingly. On this sandy and false foun...

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David Copperfield

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: I do not find it easy to get sufficiently far away from this Book, in the first sensations of having finished it, to refer to it with the composure which this formal heading would seem to require. My interest in it, is so recent and strong; and my mind is so divided between pleasure and regret?pleasure in the achievement of a long design, regret in the separation from many companions?that I am in danger of wearying the reader whom I love, with personal confidences, and private emotions.

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Vices Are Not Crimes : A Vindication of Moral Liberty

By: Lysander Spooner

Vices are those acts by which a man harms himself or his property. Crimes are those acts by which one man harms the person or property of another. Vices are simply the errors which a man makes in his search after his own happiness. Unlike crimes, they imply no malice toward others, and no interference with their persons or property. In vices, the very essence of crime—that is, the design to injure the person or property of another—is wanting. It is a maxim of the law tha...

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Original Maupassant Short Stories, Volume 6

By: Guy de Maupassant

The household lived frugally on the meager income derived from the husband's insignificant appointments. Two children had been born of the marriage, and the earlier condition of the strictest economy had become one of quiet, concealed, shamefaced misery, the poverty of a noble family -- which in spite of misfortune never forgets its rank. Hector de Gribelin had been educated in the provinces, under the paternal roof, by an aged priest. His people were not rich, but they ...

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Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

By: Lord Byron

The following poem was written, for the most part, amidst the scenes which it attempts to describe. It was begun in Albania; and the parts relative to Spain and Portugal were composed from the author's observations in those countries. Thus much it may be necessary to state for the correctness of the descriptions. The scenes attempted to be sketched are in Spain, Portugal, Epirus, Acarnania, and Greece. There, for the present, the poem stops; its reception will determine ...

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Cape Cod Stories

By: Joseph Crosby Lincoln

Excerpt: TWO PAIRS OF SHOES I don?t exactly know why Cap'n Jonadab and me went to the post? office that night; we wa'n't expecting any mail, that?s sartin. I guess likely we done it for the reason the feller that tumbled overboard went to the bottom ?twas the handiest place TO go. Anyway we was there, and I was propping up the stove with my feet and holding down a chair with the rest of me, when Jonadab heaves alongside flying distress signals. He had an envelope in his ...

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The Life of Timon of Athens

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Mer. O pray let?s see't. For the Lord Timon, sir? Iewel. If he will touch the estimate. But for that? Poet. When we for recompence haue prais?d the vild, It staines the glory in that happy Verse, Which aptly sings the good ?

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One of Ours

By: Willa Sibert Cather

Excerpt: Book One: On Lovely Creek I. Claude Wheeler opened his eyes before the sun was up and vigorously shook his younger brother, who lay in the other half of the same bed. ?Ralph, Ralph, get awake! Come down and help me wash the car.? ?What for?? ?Why, aren't we going to the circus today?? ?Car?s all right. Let me alone.? The boy turned over and pulled the sheet up to his face, to shut out the light which was beginning to come through the curtainless windows. Claude ...

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A Whisper in the Dark

By: Louisa May Alcott

Excerpt: As we rolled along, I scanned my companion covertly, and saw much to interest a girl of seventeen. My uncle was a handsome man, with all the polish of foreign life fresh upon him; yet it was neither comeliness nor graceful ease which most attracted me; for even my inexperienced eye caught glimpses of something stern and somber below these external charms, and my long scrutiny showed me the keenest eye, the hardest mouth, the subtlest smile I ever saw a face whic...

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Guy Garrick

By: Arthur Benjamin Reeve

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE STOLEN MOTOR. ?You are aware, I suppose, Marshall, that there have been considerably over a million dollars? worth of automobiles stolen in this city during the past few months?? asked Guy Garrick one night when I had dropped into his office.

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The Passing of the Blessed Virgin Mary

In that time before the Lord came to His passion, and among many words which the mother asked of the Son, she began to ask Him about her own departure, addressing Him as follows:—O most dear Son, I pray Thy holiness, that when my soul goes out of my body, Thou let me know on the third day before; and do Thou, beloved Son, with Thy angels, receive it. (2) Then He received the prayer of His beloved mother, and said to her: O palace and temple of the living God, O blessed m...

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The London Theatres

By: Henry James

Excerpt: A PERSON taking up his residence in a foreign city is apt, I think, to become something of a playgoer. In the first place he is usually more or less isolated, and in the absence of complex social ties the theatres help him to pass his evenings.

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Proposed Roads to Freedom

By: Bertrand Russell

Introduction: The attempt to conceive imaginatively a better ordering of human society than the destructive and cruel chaos in which mankind has hitherto existed is by no means modern: it is at least as old as Plato, whose ?Republic? set the model for the Utopias of subsequent philosophers. Whoever contemplates the world in the light of an ideal ? whether what he seeks be intellect, or art, or love, or simple happiness, or all together ? must feel a great sorrow in the e...

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The Secret Adversary

By: Agatha Christie

IT was 2 p.m. on the afternoon of May 7, 1915. The Lusitania had been struck by two torpedoes in succession and was sinking rapidly, while the boats were being launched with all possible speed. The women and children were being lined up awaiting their turn. Some still clung desperately to husbands and fathers; others clutched their children closely to their breasts. One girl stood alone, slightly apart from the rest. She was quite young, not more than eighteen. She did n...

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The Forerunner

By: Kahlil Gibran

Always have we been our own forerunners, and always shall we be. And all that we have gathered and shall gather shall be but seeds for fields yet unploughed. We are the fields and the ploughmen, the gatherers and the gathered. When you were a wandering desire in the mist, I too was there, a wandering desire. Then we sought one another, and out of our eagerness dreams were born. And dreams were time limitless, and dreams were space without measure.

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Legends of Babylon and Egypt in Relation to Hebrew Tradition

By: Leonard W. King

In these lectures an attempt is made, not so much to restate familiar facts, as to accommodate them to new and supplementary evidence which has been published in America since the outbreak of the war. But even without the excuse of recent discovery, no apology would be needed for any comparison or contrast of Hebrew tradition with the mythological and legendary beliefs of Babylon and Egypt. Hebrew achievements in the sphere of religion and ethics are only thrown into str...

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