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Greenery Day

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Title: Greenery Day  
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Subject: Arbor Day, Golden Week (Japan), Public holidays in Japan, Constitution Memorial Day, Culture Day
Collection: April Observances, Festivals in Japan, Forestry Events, May Observances, Public Holidays in Japan
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Greenery Day

Greenery Day
Observed by Japan
Type National
Date May 4
Related to Golden Week (Japan), World Environment Day

Greenery Day (みどりの日 Midori no Hi). The present observation of Greenery Day as a national holiday in Japan stems from the celebration of the Emperor Shōwa's birthday on April 29 every year during the Shōwa era. In 1989, following the ascension of the current Emperor Akihito to the Chrysanthemum Throne, the name of the holiday was changed from "Birthday of the Emperor" to "Greenery Day".[1] Officially, as its name suggests, it is a day to commune with nature and to be thankful for blessings. The day was renamed to "Greenery Day" to acknowledge the controversial wartime emperor's love for plants without directly mentioning his name.[2] However, in practice it is seen as just another day that expands the Japanese Golden Week vacation.

In 2007, Greenery Day moved to May 4, and April 29 was changed to Shōwa Day in accordance with a 2005 revision of the law pertaining to public holidays. The Shōwa Emperor reigned for 62 years and 2 weeks. On May 3, 1947, he became a symbol of Japan by the new constitution of the country.

Years April 29 May 4
before 1985 The Emperor's Birthday Non-holiday
1985–1988 The Emperor's Birthday National day of rest
1989–2006 Greenery Day National day of rest
2007– Shōwa Day Greenery Day

See also

References

  1. ^ "Golden Week". Japan-guide.com. 2009-05-13. Retrieved 2010-02-05. 
  2. ^ Japan names day after Hirohito"'". BBC News. 2005-05-13. Retrieved 2012-12-10. 
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