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Dancing Through Literature

Coventry University in London (United Kingdom, not Ohio) offers a multidisciplinary symposium on the enduring relationship between dance and literature. That relationship has existed since ancient Egyptian times, such that dance “appears frequently across drama, poetry, and fiction to the many dance and physical theatre works based on literary sources.” 

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Newbery Medals

Best of the Best
In 1921, Frederic G. Melcher proposed an award to recognize the authors of “the most distinguished contribution to American Literature for children.” The award refers to the name of 18th century British bookseller John Newbery.  

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Honest Literature

The Importance of Being Honest
Literature around the world incorporates common themes that run true throughout the ages: acceptance, preparedness, courage, kindness, cooperation, resourcefulness, compassion, perseverance, friendship, and honesty. Classic literature extols the virtue of honesty, which preoccupies writers even today, and especially in times of political and corporate corruption.
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Class Economics

Stuck in the Middle
For decades, economic forecasters have been predicting the demise of America’s middle class. Even as far back as the 90s, the media reported on the emergence of the income gap between rich and poor, and growing inequality.   

Decades later, the Recession of 2008 certainly exasperated the situation. Many working-class Americans grew even more frustrated as wages remained stagnant or declined as unemployment rates escalated. 

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Tesla

Driving the Future
Several decades ago, it may have been difficult to fathom the everyday use of “futuristic” gadgets such as cell phones and laptops. Since then, these modern devices have become such an integral part of our daily lives—it’s now incomprehensible to imagine navigating life without them. 

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Spring Rituals

In Bloom
In destinations around the globe, many people are eager to celebrate the arrival of spring. After a long, dark winter they’re stepping outdoors to welcome the sunshine. Many cultures have their own ceremonies and festivals to mark this joyous time—a season synonymous with rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection, and regrowth.

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Japan's Greenery Day

Nature Reigns
Greenery Day, which is also known as “Midori no Hi” is a national holiday in Japan that is currently celebrated on May 4th.  

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Flowers

Symbols in Literature
“Flowers are the friends of all, and we look with amazement at the person who cannot find some amount of pleasure in their study,” begins Hilderic Friend’s book Flowers and Flower Lore. Indeed, flowers have always held a special place in the heart of humanity. They have remained evocative and highly symbolic for many different reasons to peoples throughout the ages. 

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Junot Diaz

Identity and the Convergence of Cultures
Junot Diaz, a Dominican American writer, is a master of the combinatorial, the high and low brow, the bridge between intellect, crudeness, colloquial, and many silent histories. He’ll have characters using two or more registers of banter, and flip through Spanish and English, and then throw in a region-specific reference as well. He is an utter and quintessential confluence whose books have redefined how we look at identity, homeland, the lasting effects of the convergence of culture and history. 

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William Shakespeare

Forever and a Day
Is it possible for something or someone to be so ubiquitous that it is near negligible, like the air we breathe? Is it merely a sign of the times to know so many a person by name but not by substance? Are we the era of jack of all trades, but master of none?

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Earth Day

Nature of Yesteryear
April 22 is Earth Day, a worldwide event that celebrates our stewardship of Earth. It was devised in 1970 by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, and spurred on by a recent oil spill in Santa Barbara and the gathering public consciousness of anti-war protests. It became more popular and meaningful every year since. 
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Passion of the Sonnet

Savage Traditions and their Detectives
A look at the sonnet through The Savage Detectives.
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Threadbare

Lace in Literature
The socioeconomic symbolism of lace throughout much of fashion history cannot be underestimated. Readers of historical romance understands the significance of any mention of a four-inch lace hem, lace-trimmed ruffles, or a froth of lace at throat and cuffs.

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The Literature of Vermin

World Rat Day
April 4 is World Rat Day. The very thought of celebrating vermin detested the world over makes one shiver with loathing. 
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March Author Spotlight

BS Murthy
BS Murthy was born in 1948, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, India. He has worked as a Hyderabad-based insurance surveyor and loss assessor since 1986. He is married with two sons, the elder one holding a Ph.D. in finance and the younger a master’s degree in Engineering.
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Racial Inequality

African American Stories

Racial inequality in the United States underlies a wide range of societal issues that affect the life chances of different groups disproportionately by race. There are vast differences in wealth across racial groups in the United States. There are many causes, including years of home ownership, household income, unemployment, and education, but inheritance might be the most important.

http://worldheritage.org/articles/Racial_inequality_in_the_United_States

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Leading the Way

Novelist Edith Wharton


Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Wharton combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era's other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt.

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Literature of Foodies

Whetting the Appetite
Foodies are a distinct hobbyist group. Typical foodie interests and activities include the food industry, wineries and wine tasting, breweries and beer sampling, food science, following restaurant openings and closings and occasionally reopenings, food distribution, food fads, health and nutrition, cooking classes, culinary tourism, and restaurant management

Works on Gastronomy

There have been many writings on gastronomy throughout the world that capture the thoughts and aesthetics of a culture's cuisine during a period in their history. In some cases, these works continue to define or influence the contemporary gastronomic thought and cuisine of their respective cultures.

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Freedom to Read

Banned Books
Banned books are books or other printed works such as essays or plays which are prohibited by law or to which free access is not permitted by other means. The practice of banning books is a form of censorship, from political, legal, religious, moral, or (less often) commercial motives. This article lists notable banned books and works, giving a brief context for the reason that each book was prohibited. Banned books include fictional works such as novels, poems and plays and non-fiction works such as biographies and dictionaries.

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Children's Literature

Based in the Classics

Children's literature or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader.

Children's literature can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 1400s, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children. The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries became known as the "Golden Age of Children's Literature" as this period included the publication of many books acknowledged today as classics.    


http://worldheritage.org/articles/Children's_literature 

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