World Library  

Library Exhibits


 
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Anti-Intellectualism

A Non-Comprehensive Compilation of Facts of Feelings
A poll was taken in 2014, that revealed one in four Americans thinks that the sun revolves around Earth. Most people agree that global warming is real, but many of these same people believe that it will only affect other people. Non-scientists argue with scientists and doctors about whether vaccines are good or bad. Are these three ideas latent traces of a manifest-your-own destiny, a power-of-the-mind ability to turn feelings into facts? 

This is the battle of intellectualism versus anti-intellectualism.
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Child Labor

A Brief History
Only in the latter half of the 20th century did the concept of a carefree childhood emerge as a right of all children rather than just the privileged few. Until then, parents and businesses viewed children as an abundant, renewable source of cheap labor. Low income and rural families especially relied upon the labor of children to contribute to put food on the table.

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The Pleasures of Picnicking

During seasonal weather, people yearn to enjoy the great outdoors. Sunny, mild days offer ideal opportunities for hosting picnics in the park. Charming wicker baskets, country-style checkered tablecloths, leisurely pleasures, and delectable food come to mind.

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Paul Bunyan

Hero of the North Woods
Few folk tales from ages past endure in today’s children’s literature. Paul Bunyan is no exception. The folk hero was portrayed as a giant of a man at seven feet tall, renowned for his great strength, powerful voice, massive pipe, and memorable sidekicks, not the least of which was Babe, the blue ox. Tales of his illiteracy recount entertaining errors when ordering supplies.

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Leading the Way

Novelist Edith Wharton


Edith Wharton was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Wharton combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era's other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt.

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Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

As of 2014, The U.S. Census Bureau estimated that there were about 20.3 million American residents who were Asian or mixed with Asian, as well as an additional 1.5 million Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders. The celebration was chosen to be in May to honor both the first immigration of Japanese to the United States, in May 1843, and the completion of the transcontinental railroad, in May 1869, by mostly Chinese immigrants.

According to the official Asian/Pacific American Heritage website, the rather broad term Asian/Pacific includes all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, and Easter Island). It’s a much more diverse group than many might realize. 
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Agriculture Then and Now

Science records the development of agriculture back more than 10,000 years with Neolithic evidence of crops of wheat, barley, peas, lentils, chick peas, flax, and rice. Following the sowing and harvesting of grains and legumes, early Old World farmers domesticated pigs, then sheep, and then cattle. New World farmers focused on sorghum and potatoes, followed by coca, llamas, alpacas, and guinea pigs. Maize and cotton were latecomers to the agricultural repertoire.

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Tattoo You

Once considered rebellious and were associated with sailors, criminals, and thugs, over the years tattoos have become mainstream in countries around the globe.

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Staying Power

New Lexicography
Every year, lexicographers must decide which popular words and phrases will be added to dictionaries. Tuned into books, politics, business, technology, the arts, and media, these word masters observe which words and phrases are used most frequently, exactly how they’re used, and what they mean.

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Transportation, Fairy Tale Style

Written in a pre-industrial age, transportation in fairy tales typically finds itself restricted to walking on one’s own two feet, riding on horseback or in a carriage pulled by horses, or sailing on a ship. Modern writers, particularly those who write within the genre of historical fiction or pre-industrial, or steampunk fantasy, also rely on those standard forms of transportation, although they often get it wrong.

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Making a Difference

Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela International Day, which will be held on July 18th 2017, commemorates Nelson Mandela’s dedication and service to South Africa, as well as other people and cultures of the world.

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LA FÊTE NATIONALE

Revolution 101
Bastille Day, a French National holiday celebrated July 14th, marks both the storming of the Bastille castle on July 14th, 1789, and the turning point in the French Revolution. The Bastille was a medieval castle that was then used as a prison as well as an armory. It was key that the Revolutionaries stormed the castle not only for the stores of guns and gunpowder, but also to symbolically overthrow the symbol of monarchy the Bastille had embodied for years. The morning after, King Louis XVI was informed by the Duke of La Rochefoucauld, and asked him, “Is it a revolt?” To which the Duke famously replied, “No sire, it’s not a revolt; it’s a revolution.”

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The World's Wealth

An Economics Exhibit
The World's Wealth:  An Economics Exhibit

This virtual exhibit offers significant insight into the money, economic theories and political influence on economies.  The historical economic discoveries and records of common men and great economists alike have been preserved in a treasure trove of works and documents in the World’s Wealth Exhibit.  A focused exploration into historical documents within our Collection will give readers a sound foundation for understanding of government, society and finance processes.


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Worlds Within Words

A Literature Exhibit
Worlds Within Words:  A Literature Exhibit

Literature comes from the Greek word litaritura, or "writing formed with letters."

Literature pertains to the nature of books and writings that are culturally or historically significant.  This virtual exhibit, "Worlds Within Words," presents the development of literature from the oral histories to the invention of writing by the Babylonians to the most influential authors of our time.  Reading books and writing letters were once a significant part of daily existence, and was treated as entertainment and recreational experiences. It is hoped, with all the Collections contained within our many Classic and Children's Literature Collections, people will again turn to the wonderful discovery and the broadening of horizons that reading provides.  Great authors such as:  Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, John Steinbeck, George Orwell, Shakespeare, Mark Twain and thousands of others represented in our many Literature Collections.
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The Art of War by Sun Tzu

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"The Art of War"  

Sun Tzu said great warriors are already victorious before they go to war. The supreme art of war is to vanquish your enemy without fighting.
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The White Company by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Behind the Book Lecture Series

Sherlock Holmes was an extremely profitable character for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. His character is still prevalent today in literature and pop culture.
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Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Robinson Crusoe"

If you were on an island and you got to be king of that world, how would you govern it? Is there a noble form of colonization? This novel forces readers to struggle with this question.
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The Social Contract by Jean Jacques Rousseau

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
The Social Contract

He was unstable, with bouts of hypochondria and extreme paranoia; he was scandalous and super influential in the revolutionary spirit of his day. Jean Jacques Rousseau was Hollywood before there was Hollywood.
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Das Kapital by Karl Marx

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Das Kapital"

Das Kapital or “Capital: Critique of Political Economy” was written by Karl Marx in 1867 and it is the masterwork of communist ideology, political theory, and economic critique.
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Tesla

Driving the Future
Several decades ago, it may have been difficult to fathom the everyday use of “futuristic” gadgets such as cell phones and laptops. Since then, these modern devices have become such an integral part of our daily lives—it’s now incomprehensible to imagine navigating life without them. 

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Moving Abroad

Expat Writers and Artists
Immigration continues to be a hot topic in cities worldwide. A variety of factors—war, economic opportunity, religious freedom, etc.—drive it. According to information released by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 244 million people lived abroad in 2015—an increase of 71 million since 2000.

Top destinations for immigration include the U.S., Germany, and the U.K. A recent article in The Telegraph, published in London, states that “rates of immigration are increasing in the world—with immigrants consisting of 12.1 percent of the world’s population in 2005, compared to 13.2 percent in 2015.” 

Not only have social and political factors motivated people to flee their homelands over the course of history, but so have literature and the arts served as inspiration for many. 
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The Authentic and Aesthetic

Art, music, and literature experienced a change in emphasis in the late 1700s and peaked in the mid 1800s. Fatigued and disillusioned by decades of war and corrupt politics, European—and especially British—writers adjusted their focus from morality and instruction to entertainment. The movement coincided with the rise of the Industrial Revolution and the growing reliance upon the logic and rationality of science.

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Pablo Neruda

Love and Politics
Born on July 12th, 1904, Pablo Neruda, or Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto, was a Nobel-winning, Chilean poet and diplomat whose staunch support for communism and fierce love of Chile and his Chilean compatriots, intertwined to create a powerhouse of a man. He has been called one of the greatest poets of the 20th century by the likes of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Harold Bloom, and had the literary respect from writers such as Octavio Paz, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriela Mistral, and has remained one of the most widely read poets in the world.

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The Science of Conflict

An Exhibit on Warfare
The Science of Conflict:  An Exhibit on Warfare

This exhibition demonstrates the frailty and vulnerabilities of humankind.  Violence, social disruption and economic and physical destruction of lives are the abhor-able consequences of warfare.  However, without war...there could be no peace.  In life, there is always a struggle with achieving balance.  In our many Collections, there are opportunities to read about what the most significant minds (from military generals to philosophers to the writings of religious orders to the greatest literary novelists, about war and peace.
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The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals by Immanuel Kant

The Behind the Book Lecture Series

The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals has never not been famous. It was an immediate success. We have the ability to choose what is right and what is wrong. To understand how we have that ability and the implications of that ability is what the groundwork sets out.
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The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"The Prince"

Machiavelli’s The Prince has become the foremost treatise on power. The driving idea in it was how do you make a dangerous and fluid situation stable? His answer: by any means necessary.
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Two Treatises of Government by John Locke

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"Two Treatises of Government"

What makes government good? John Locke's answer was that good government came from the people, was for the people, and was by the people. Locke was so influential on a minority revolution in North America in a country that would come to be called The United States.
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Spring Rituals

In Bloom
In destinations around the globe, many people are eager to celebrate the arrival of spring. After a long, dark winter they’re stepping outdoors to welcome the sunshine. Many cultures have their own ceremonies and festivals to mark this joyous time—a season synonymous with rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection, and regrowth.

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Mother Goose

Children’s First Literature
The first literature often introduced to children in the Western world consisted of the rhymes and fairy tales published under the anonymous Mother Goose. This fabled wise woman is often depicted as an archetypal country woman or, yes, a goose wearing a peasant dress and shawl.

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The “See-Food” Diet

Diet and nutrition fill over a quarter million pages of text within the World Library’s virtual bookshelves. GoodReads lists 43,181 titles focused on food and drink, and Amazon’s search results for “diet” yields 186,133 titles for printed books and 30,071 e-book titles. Titles focusing on what and when to eat tout their food and drink regimens as the answer to many problems related to health, energy, and moral character.

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International Women's Day

Celebrating Rebellious Women
International Women's Day (IWD), is celebrated on March 8 every year.

In different regions the focus of the celebrations ranges from general celebration of respect, appreciation, and love towards women to a celebration for women's economic, political, and social achievements. Started as a Socialist political event, the holiday blended the culture of many countries, primarily in Europe, especially those in the Soviet Bloc. In some regions, the day lost its political flavor, and became simply an occasion for people to express their love for women in a way somewhat similar to a mixture of Mother's Day and Valentine's Day. In other regions, however, the political and human rights theme designated by the United Nations runs strong, and political and social awareness of the struggles of women worldwide are brought out and examined in a hopeful manner. Some people celebrate the day by wearing purple ribbons.

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Freedom to Read

Banned Books
Banned books are books or other printed works such as essays or plays which are prohibited by law or to which free access is not permitted by other means. The practice of banning books is a form of censorship, from political, legal, religious, moral, or (less often) commercial motives. This article lists notable banned books and works, giving a brief context for the reason that each book was prohibited. Banned books include fictional works such as novels, poems and plays and non-fiction works such as biographies and dictionaries.

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Newbery Medals

Best of the Best
In 1921, Frederic G. Melcher proposed an award to recognize the authors of “the most distinguished contribution to American Literature for children.” The award refers to the name of 18th century British bookseller John Newbery.  

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Threadbare

Lace in Literature
The socioeconomic symbolism of lace throughout much of fashion history cannot be underestimated. Readers of historical romance understands the significance of any mention of a four-inch lace hem, lace-trimmed ruffles, or a froth of lace at throat and cuffs.

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Passion of the Sonnet

Savage Traditions and their Detectives
A look at the sonnet through The Savage Detectives.
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Japan's Greenery Day

Nature Reigns
Greenery Day, which is also known as “Midori no Hi” is a national holiday in Japan that is currently celebrated on May 4th.  

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World Turtle Day

Making Slow Strides
Celebrate World Turtle Day on May 23rd. The American Tortoise Rescue, a nonprofit organization founded to protect turtles and tortoises, and their vanishing habitats, established this commemorative holiday in 2000 to encourage people to boost their knowledge of both creatures. 

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Up In Smoke

Observed on May 31st, World No Tobacco Day is held annually in destinations around the world. It encourages a 24-hour period of abstinence from all forms of tobacco. The day also generates awareness of the negative health effects associated with tobacco such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, and more.

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Practicing Mindfulness

In today’s fast-paced digital era, many people yearn for some leisure time. When they finally have some highly coveted down time, rather than indulging in the moment—a silent stroll through the park attuned to the beauty and serenity that abounds—they spend their time talking on their phones, browsing Facebook, and keeping their minds super busy.

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World Red Cross Day

World of Good
When disaster strikes—whether it’s a devastating natural event such as a powerful hurricane or earthquake, a health outbreak such as Ebola, or a mass evacuation of people fleeing war-torn countries, Red Cross organizations around the globe are quick to respond. 

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Order

A Law Exhibit
Order:  A Law Exhibit

Our many book collections feature the top 100 greatest books which showcase the formation of governments and their varied legal systems from around the world, throughout time.  Books from our Government and Law Collections are included, as are books from a Religion and Philosophy Collections - since these disciplines have played a significant role in the development of systems and governments.  The Magna Carta and Code Napoléon and Declaration of Independence are examples of the the timeless documents which remain more relevant as ever and continue to be referenced and analyzed as systems of cooperation between world citizens.
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Sacred Words and Deeds

An Exhibit on Religion
Sacred Words and Deeds:  An Exhibit on Religion

Nothing motivates people more than faith.  Religions have brought both comfort and struggle to world populations throughout time.  Faith in religious, and hence, moral concepts have expanded from the reading and studying of The Bible or Qu'ran to include an inter-disciplinary of complex ideologies.  From the inspirational to the mathematical:  these multi-volume Collections assist readers and life students in their quest to understand man's relationship to God or gods, to nature and each other.
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Literature of Foodies

Whetting the Appetite
Foodies are a distinct hobbyist group. Typical foodie interests and activities include the food industry, wineries and wine tasting, breweries and beer sampling, food science, following restaurant openings and closings and occasionally reopenings, food distribution, food fads, health and nutrition, cooking classes, culinary tourism, and restaurant management

Works on Gastronomy

There have been many writings on gastronomy throughout the world that capture the thoughts and aesthetics of a culture's cuisine during a period in their history. In some cases, these works continue to define or influence the contemporary gastronomic thought and cuisine of their respective cultures.

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William Shakespeare

Forever and a Day
Is it possible for something or someone to be so ubiquitous that it is near negligible, like the air we breathe? Is it merely a sign of the times to know so many a person by name but not by substance? Are we the era of jack of all trades, but master of none?

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Charge Your Style with Life

March Poetry Corner Exhibit
In the countable sense, a verse is formally a single metrical line in a poetic composition. However, verse has come to represent any division or grouping of words in a poetic composition, with groupings traditionally having been referred to as stanzas.

In the uncountable (mass noun) sense verse refers to "poetry" as contrasted to prose. Where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme, the common unit of prose is purely grammatical, such as a sentence or paragraph. Verse has had a traditional application in drama, which is therefore known as dramatic poetry, verse drama, or dramatic verse.     


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Tomato vs. Book vs. Fiction vs. Farce

A Gander Into Farce

A peanut gallery was, in the days of vaudeville, a nickname for the cheapest (and ostensibly rowdiest) seats in the theater, the occupants of which were often known to heckle.

The least expensive snack served at the theatre would often be peanuts, which the patrons would sometimes throw at the performers on stage to convey their disapproval. The phrases "no comments from the peanut gallery" or "quiet in the peanut gallery" are extensions of the name.

In 1943 the Howdy Doody children's radio show adopted the name to represent its audience of children. Howdy Doody is most remembered for its later transition to television, which continued the Peanut Gallery audience, now on camera.


http://worldheritage.org/articles/Peanut_gallery

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Black History Month

A Look Back

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada in February and the United Kingdom.

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Earth Day

Nature of Yesteryear
April 22 is Earth Day, a worldwide event that celebrates our stewardship of Earth. It was devised in 1970 by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, and spurred on by a recent oil spill in Santa Barbara and the gathering public consciousness of anti-war protests. It became more popular and meaningful every year since. 
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Junot Diaz

Identity and the Convergence of Cultures
Junot Diaz, a Dominican American writer, is a master of the combinatorial, the high and low brow, the bridge between intellect, crudeness, colloquial, and many silent histories. He’ll have characters using two or more registers of banter, and flip through Spanish and English, and then throw in a region-specific reference as well. He is an utter and quintessential confluence whose books have redefined how we look at identity, homeland, the lasting effects of the convergence of culture and history. 

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Flowers

Symbols in Literature
“Flowers are the friends of all, and we look with amazement at the person who cannot find some amount of pleasure in their study,” begins Hilderic Friend’s book Flowers and Flower Lore. Indeed, flowers have always held a special place in the heart of humanity. They have remained evocative and highly symbolic for many different reasons to peoples throughout the ages. 

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Honest Literature

The Importance of Being Honest
Literature around the world incorporates common themes that run true throughout the ages: acceptance, preparedness, courage, kindness, cooperation, resourcefulness, compassion, perseverance, friendship, and honesty. Classic literature extols the virtue of honesty, which preoccupies writers even today, and especially in times of political and corporate corruption.
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History of Healing

A Medical Exhibit
History of Healing: A Medical Exhibit

This collection of 100 is filled with the most influential medical texts and curated from our extensive collections of books and medical journals which illustrate the history of medicine, health, fitness and biology. It tells the story of mankind's need to heal and understand disease and how it affects populations. The greatest Ancient Greek and Roman philosophers' writings, esteemed medical journals, medical canons, and history of medicine, are included, all digitally remastered. In truth, ancient medical texts have almost all been lost to history. The books, journals and manuscripts in our collections celebrates the history of healing, medical practitioners and advocates, and the countless precious scribes who wrote down this important foundation of knowledge so that it could be passed on to others. Our collections draw a detailed picture of the evolution and migration of medical knowledge that continues to influence modern medicine and other healing arts today. The exhibit is accompanied by books about the world history of medicine and its evolution from superstition and magic to tested theories.
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Power

An Exhibit on Politics
Power:  An Exhibit on Politics

This virtual exhibit examines the history of political ideologies and the on the application of personal and political power within the context of social and resource control.  Throughout history, man has struggled for both control, and sovereignty. The concepts of freedom and independence have been great inspiration for writers throughout millenia.  These documents are located in the following Collections: Politics, Anthropology, Sociology, Psychology, Philosophy, Government, Law, Literature...among many other volumes of influential works.


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Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes

The Behind the Book Lecture Series

Thomas Hobbes "Leviathan" was the foundational text of social contract theory. It was the first really robust exploration into why people come together, under governments, and what makes those governments legitimate and workable.
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History's Classroom

A Historical Perspective on Education
History's Classroom: A Historical Perspective on Education

The voices of mathematicians, scientists, philosophers are included in this virtual exhibit, "History's Classroom: A Historical Perspective on Education." 

From ancient manuscripts to the unmatched selection of the world's much treasured children's picture books, the enduring importance of education and literacy is illustrated in the thousands of books contained in many collections joined to this exhibit. Subjects such as anthropology, religion, sociology, astronomy and Shakespeare are within. These books are vital to the continuation of mankind, as the sharing of knowledge, teaching and literacy are the cornerstone of everything we do, and want to accomplish. Perpetual pursuit of knowledge moves society forward.
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Building Societies

An Exhibit on Governments
Building Societies:  An Exhibit on Governments

The titles in the Building Societies Collection include important historic works regarding the complex processes needed in order to manage conflicts and the details that arise when administering territories as populations grow. The exhibit contains the most important books written about the histories of rising and falling governments, conquerors and statesman, and important theorists and philosophers.

This presentation is representative of the most significant accounts of those that have shaped the world we live in today, including, but not limited to the most influential top 100 books in Government, Economics, Political Science and Philosophy Collections. On the subject of governance, Aristotle wrote: "...But one factor of liberty is to govern and be governed in turn; for the popular principle of justice is to have equality according to number, not worth, ...And one is for a man to live as he likes; for they say that this is the function of liberty inasmuch as to live not as one likes is the life of a man that is a slave..."  (The Works of Aristotle, Aristotle).  
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Quantifying the Universe

A Mathematics Exhibit
Quantifying the Universe:  A Mathematics Exhibit

Explaining everything through numbers and formulas may seem counter-intuitive to most, however, the very best physicists and mathematicians in history have been able to explain (with mat), most everything that up to 50 years ago had been a mystery.  With the rare documents and books within our Math, Astronomy, Science-Chemistry and Physics Collections...you too, can experience the gift of knowledge that great scientists like Albert Einstein, Isaac Asimov, Aristotle and more, have given us.
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Poète Maudit

The Seer and the Forest Fire
“La race toujours maudite par les puissants de la terre.” Or, “The race that will always be cursed by the powerful ones of the earth,” wrote author Alfred De Vigny in his novel Stello. Poet Paul Verlaine put it to wider use in his own work to describe both writers and artists who were against or otherwise working outside mainstream society. 

And the “race” was called the poète maudit, cursed poet.

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Animal Magnetism

Within recent years, pets have managed to climb the ranks to secure coveted spots atop family pedestals. These domestic companions—from the familiar dogs and cats to more exotic parrots, sugar gliders, and iguanas—have captured their owners’ hearts and nudged them to open up their wallets.
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Human Innovation

A Technology Exhibit
Human Innovation: A Technology Exhibit presents an unparalleled group of books showing the progression of the human race through technology. Once man was controlled by nature; now he is attempting to conquer both time and space. The following collections represent our endless quest for knowledge to bring us to where we are today: a high technology, globally connected world. Large cultural leaps were made and revolutions begun with inventions such as the Gutenberg Press, radio, the telephone and the rocket engine. 

Collections: Technology, Science, Physics, Mathematics, warfare and under other disciplines.

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History of Perfume

We’ve all been captivated by the alluring scents of fresh flowers, baking bread, or brewing coffee. Since scent is routed through the olfactory bulb, which is connected to regions of the brain that relate to memory and emotion, it has the capability of triggering emotion.

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Words of the People

An Exhibit on Language
The Words of the People:  An Exhibit on Language

From the oldest forms of writings with pictographs and Cuneiform in 3500 B.C. to the generation of the first alphabet; of all the strides that we have made in technology, Language has been the single most important "invention" since the dawn of man.  In fact, language defies time.  Language is the greatest man-made achievement.  Tone, intonation, inflection, the tongue, the throat, the breath and the brain:  all lifeforms have some form of communication.  The proceeding Collections in "The Words of the People:  An Exhibit on Language" includes the most significant books on the subject of language.

Language, Literature, Children's Literature, Hawaiiana, Poetry and more.
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Gay Pride Month

LGBTQ Writers of Immanence
June was designated as Gay Pride Month to commemorate the Stonewall Riots of June 28, 1969, a series of days that marked the breaking point of tensions between the LGBTQ communities and the New York City Police Department. It was the first major protest for LGBTQ rights in history.

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Class Economics

Stuck in the Middle
For decades, economic forecasters have been predicting the demise of America’s middle class. Even as far back as the 90s, the media reported on the emergence of the income gap between rich and poor, and growing inequality.   

Decades later, the Recession of 2008 certainly exasperated the situation. Many working-class Americans grew even more frustrated as wages remained stagnant or declined as unemployment rates escalated. 

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World Refugee Day

The UN Convention
While a concerted effort at refugee relief is a relatively new enterprise, refugees are as old as war. In 1951, only six years after the end of World War II, the United Nations began to address the issue of refugees. The multilateral treaty known as the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees has been ratified a handful of times since and sets the terms for what is and is not a refugee.

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Tune Out & Tune In

With growing efforts and awareness of the peril of our oceans and land, more people are making strides to conserve. Eco-conscious people worldwide are pitching in to save the planet. Efforts encompass recycling to conserving water and energy to reducing carbon footprints, and choosing reusable cloth totes over plastic bags. Many are eager to do their fair share.

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Human Trafficking

Human trafficking has been an ongoing atrocity, which occurs in destinations around the globe. Its victims, which include women, children, and men, are subject to a variety of forms of trafficking. These include sex trafficking, forced labor, and domestic servitude. Restore NYC—a nationally recognized leader in identifying and helping trafficked women, estimates that 18,000 foreign nationals are trafficked into the U.S. each year.

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Character Growth

An Exhibit on Children's Literature

Character Growth:  An Exhibit on Children's Literature


Childhood reading builds character and books open young minds to the world and the limitless realm of imagination, and learning. Prior to the advent of mass media communication, books and letter writing were a part of the daily lives of people. Reading letters and books were considered the entertainment of the day. Recreational reading was anticipated with enthusiasm and brought joy to everyone in the home. Additionally, reading to children below age 6 helps them develop critical skills like solving mysteries, recognizing patterns, literacy and diction. In this exhibit, entitled "Character Growth:  An Exhibit on Children's Literature," the world's greatest children's writers and famed novelists, explores the most extensive digitally remastered classic children's literature in the world. From Classic Children's Literature titles, Baby's ABC Book to The Velveteen Rabbit - building character in young ones begins with parental guidance and books. 

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Heroic Myth to Little Green Men

Tales of Outer Space
Ancient astronomers discerned patterns of stars, constellations anchored by particularly bright points of light, and named them. The Western world knows these constellations mainly by their Greek names and through Greek myth: Cassiopeia, Orion, Pegasus, etc. Other cultures grouped constellations differently and assigned them different names in accordance to their mythologies and heroic traditions. From Lucian’s second century True History to 10th century Japan’s The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter to the Middle East’s medieval One Thousand and One Arabian Nights and throughout the millennia to the modern age, mankind’s fascination with the “Great Beyond” never ceases.

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Examining the Universe

A Science Exhibit
Examining the Universe: A Science Exhibit

This exhibit celebrates man's perennial search for an understanding of his relationship to nature. "Examining the Universe: A Science Exhibit," features the most important scientific titles by the greatest minds in math, physics, philosophy, chemistry medicine and biology. The hundreds of volumes in these collections illustrate the systematic study of the mysterious thread that runs through the life. 
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Blessings in Bubonic Rags

The Plague and the Printing Press
There’s an old Chinese proverb about a farmer, his son, and their horse. One day the horse ran off, and when the neighbors heard, they came to commiserate. But the farmer rejected their sympathy, saying to them, “Who knows what’s good or bad?” The next day, the horse returned and brought with him a wild horse. Upon hearing the news, his neighbors came to give their congratulations, but the farmer rejected their congratulations and said, “Who knows what’s good or bad?” Later, when the son was trying to tame the wild horse and was thrown from its back and broke his leg. The neighbors came to the farmer once more saying “How unfortunate! Now your son cannot work on the farm with you!” And once more the farmer said, “Who knows what’s good or bad?” And as it happened, the next day officials arrived in the town to conscript all able-bodied young men to fight in a war, but since the son was injured he was spared.

This paradoxical domino effect can be seen—and in fact, finding these effects is a practice of many historians—when studying the many differing impacts of historical events.  

One paradox can be found during the Black Death
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Zoom Zoom

The Automobile in Literature
Cars in literature can symbolize affluence, puckish determination, and mystery. Try to imagine James Bond stepping from a prosaic Honda Civic instead of a sleek, speedy, gadget-loaded Aston Martin. The mind boggles. Motorheads around the world can find vehicular inspiration in literature. From self-driving cars to alien life forms, the automobile projects a solid presence and often features as its own persona in popular literature and film. 

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Dystopian Horizons

Concrete uniformity. Brutalism. Doublespeak. Big Brother is watching you. Firemen coming to burn your belongings rather than douse them. For the good of the people, the nation. Propagandize the anthem. Remember, remember the fifth of November, The Gunpowder Treason and Plot!

Speculate on the words above—does it make you squeal? If so, is it with joy or horror? Does it make you dream, or does it suppress your foolishness so you may sleep soundly, night after night? Does it connect you to the overmind? And what may help relegate us to true uniformity?

It may be dystopia.
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The Moon

Greek Goddess to Green Cheese
Some of Western civilization’s earliest literary references to the moon arise from Greek mythology and its pantheon of bickering, lusty, greedy gods. Phoebe, Selene, Artemis, and Hecate all embodied the mystery of the moon, with Selene being the orb’s personification. The ancient Romans had Luna, from which our English word lunar is derived. The Chinese assigned goddess Chang’e to the moon.

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Human Expression

A Fine Arts Exhibit
Human Expression: A Fine Arts Exhibit

Man has always expressed a need for expression of all kinds: speech, acrylic paintings, literature, architecture, song...even the food that we eat. Theories and opinions regarding the greatest of these expressions are showcased in our collections.

Art is everywhere we look. Someone conjured these works out of their imaginations. The books in our dozens of collections (representing hundreds of books) bring beauty to the world. Explore topics such as cookbooks, audio book recordings, fine arts, technology, mathematics, film, television and poetry. 
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The Message

A Media Exhibit
The Message:  A Media Exhibit

"The Message: A Media Exhibit" reveals that although some (throughout history) have been recognized as “inventors” of media technology, this was actually a collaborative and collective process to build upon past communication technologies and infrastructures that have evolved to a point where technology is a part of the lifestyle of the majority of the world populations. 

Media has connected humankind as never before, and now the greatest stories of these inventions and their creators and their idea of spreading knowledge all over the world, can be readily accessed (with technology) within these Collections.  From the invention of the Gutenberg Press to cellphone technology, explore the wonders of media innovation...
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Love of Wisdom

A Philosophy Exhibit
Love of Wisdom:  A Philosophy Exhibit

When philosophy is read over time, it tells a story of a grand quest for wisdom.  Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Frederick Douglass, Viktor Frank, Wittgenstein, Simone de Beauvoir - trailblazing teachers who wanted to teach people to think.

Logic and Ethics are important philosophical principles for evaluating information, given and received.  No man can think, argue, love or live without this organization of reasoning - its absence makes one passionless, and fully satisfied when present.  Some philosophers, like Socrates sacrificed for their belief that everyone should ask the question, "Why?" Other thinkers such as Viktor Frankl's philos was borne out of profound personal periods in their life.  However, for whatever reason, their teachings continue having a deep impact on society even after hundreds of years.  The great philosophers of history, and their teachings are preserved in the Education, Government, Philosophy, Economics, Science-Astronomy and many other topics.
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The Human Mind

An Exhibit on Psychology
The Human Mind:  An Exhibit on Psychology

“If free will is an illusion, the positive or negative consequences affect if preceding actions would be repeated.” Discerning illusion from reality is essential in operating in a group. Confucius illustrated this well with his writings in the book, Analects.  The psychology books in Collections concentrate on the historic studies about human behavior and level of social acceptance by a group.  Other schools for the study of psychology include Carl Jung, Burrhus Skinner, Siegmund Freud who sought to seeks to mold behavior and understand patients by way of analysis and dreams, emotions, observable behavior, psychologists study and heal others – they are the doctors of the mind and the healers of the spirit. 

Our many Psychology works can be found in the following Collections:  Psychology, Sociology, Literature, Philosophy and more fine Collections to explore.


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Organizing Relationships

A Sociology Exhibit
Organizing Relationships:  A Sociology Exhibit

Many disciplines beyond Sociology, such as Mathematics and Psychology and Economics, are utilized in the Social Sciences.  In our Collections under these and other topics, contain hundreds of titles by writers and theorists who have dedicated to their lives to the study of human society.  Featured books in the following collections include Herbert Spencer, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Talcott Parsons and David Emile Durkheim.
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Symbols of Liberty

Emma Lazarus
Penned in 1883, the poem "The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus reads:

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
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The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

The Behind the Book Lecture Series
"The Wealth of Nations"

The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith’s most famous economic treatise, is his comprehensive work. If you leave the market alone will it do good? Or will it do evil? Adam Smith started this debate.
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March Author Spotlight

BS Murthy
BS Murthy was born in 1948, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from the Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, India. He has worked as a Hyderabad-based insurance surveyor and loss assessor since 1986. He is married with two sons, the elder one holding a Ph.D. in finance and the younger a master’s degree in Engineering.
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Dancing Through Literature

Coventry University in London (United Kingdom, not Ohio) offers a multidisciplinary symposium on the enduring relationship between dance and literature. That relationship has existed since ancient Egyptian times, such that dance “appears frequently across drama, poetry, and fiction to the many dance and physical theatre works based on literary sources.” 

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Brief History of American Comics

American comics have spent quite a lot of time in the pupal stage, though not without undergoing many changes and birthing many different styles throughout. 

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Songs Inspired by Literature

Great songs, ballads in particular, tell stories. Many songs employ poetic devices such as restricted line length, specific meter, and rhymes. However, songwriters, famous and not, find inspiration from literature. Wikipedia and other sites list myriad songs that retell in part or in whole works of literature. The vast list includes:


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The Literature of Vermin

World Rat Day
April 4 is World Rat Day. The very thought of celebrating vermin detested the world over makes one shiver with loathing. 
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The Limerick and Its Failure to Kick the Bucket

Hard thinking and hard living, the philosopher and the soldier, action and non-action, sense and nonsense, East and West: the ever-critical human has always been prone to compartmentalize things into black and white. We pit things against their opposites and take sides like it’s a sport.

Sense and nonsense—there needs to be a little bridge in between the two that serves as a connector, divider, and just a simple place to watch the big river roll by. This is where the limerick came in:

There was an Old Man of Nantucket,
Who kept all his cash in a bucket,
His daughter, called Nan,
Ran away with a man,
And as for the bucket, Nantucket.

From Princeton Tiger, Issue 1902
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Operation Overlord

World War II Snapshot
On June 6th, 1944, Operation Overlord commenced. It was the D-day to eclipse all other D-days, the World War II operation on a strategically unnamed day that marked the largest seaborne invasion in history. 

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In the Buff

On Nudity
The subject of nudity is mentioned in the Gutenberg Bible (1462 historic edition), which is the first major book printed using mass-produced movable metal type in Europe. In the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve are unashamed of their naked bodies until they eat the forbidden fruit and are expelled from paradise.

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A Brief History of Science Fiction

The early canonical works of science fiction have been disputed over the years. Aspects of science fiction such as redesign, post-apocalyptic landscapes, and gods as characters rather than religions, can be found scattered in mythologies and old texts like Gilgamesh. A little closer in our history, we can see dystopian societies and flying islands used satirically in Gulliver’s Travels. Then in 1818, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein was born, and most scholars contend that this was the first sci-fi novel. 

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What Is Cooking in Literature

Beyond nourishing us, food assists us in maintaining our health and can impact our moods. A source of passion and great pleasure, food also has many links with history.

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Children's Literature

Based in the Classics

Children's literature or juvenile literature includes stories, books, magazines, and poems that are enjoyed by children. Modern children's literature is classified in two different ways: genre or the intended age of the reader.

Children's literature can be traced to stories and songs, part of a wider oral tradition, that adults shared with children before publishing existed. The development of early children's literature, before printing was invented, is difficult to trace. Even after printing became widespread, many classic "children's" tales were originally created for adults and later adapted for a younger audience. Since the 1400s, a large quantity of literature, often with a moral or religious message, has been aimed specifically at children. The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries became known as the "Golden Age of Children's Literature" as this period included the publication of many books acknowledged today as classics.    


http://worldheritage.org/articles/Children's_literature 

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Racial Inequality

African American Stories

Racial inequality in the United States underlies a wide range of societal issues that affect the life chances of different groups disproportionately by race. There are vast differences in wealth across racial groups in the United States. There are many causes, including years of home ownership, household income, unemployment, and education, but inheritance might be the most important.

http://worldheritage.org/articles/Racial_inequality_in_the_United_States

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