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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Author Stephen R. Covey
Country United States
Language English
Subject Self-help
Genre non-fiction
Publisher Free Press
Publication date
1989
Media type Print (Hardcover, Paperback)
Pages 380
ISBN
OCLC 56413718
158 22
LC Class BF637.S8 C68 2004
Followed by The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, first published in 1989, is a business and self-help book written by Stephen R. Covey.[1] Covey presents an approach to being effective in attaining goals by aligning oneself to what he calls "true north" principles of a character ethic that he presents as universal and timeless.

Contents

  • The 7 Habits 1
    • Independence 1.1
    • Interdependence 1.2
    • Continuous Improvements 1.3
  • Reception 2
  • Abundance mentality 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

The 7 Habits

The book first introduces the concept of paradigm shift and helps the reader understand that different perspectives exist, i.e. that two people can see the same thing and yet differ with each other. On this premise, it introduces the seven habits in a proper order.

Each chapter is dedicated to one of the habits, which are represented by the following imperatives:

Independence

The First Three Habits surround moving from dependence to independence (i.e., self-mastery):

1 - Be Proactive
roles and relationships in life. To have a can do attitude.
2 - Begin with the End in Mind
envision what you want in the future so that you know concretely what to make a reality.
3 - Put First Things First
A manager must manage his own person. Personally. And managers should implement activities that aim to reach the second habit. Covey says that habit two is the mental creation; habit three is the physical creation.

Interdependence

The next three habits talk about Interdependence (e.g. working with others):

4 - Think Win-Win
Genuine feelings for mutually beneficial solutions or agreements in your relationships. Value and respect people by understanding a "win" for all is ultimately a better long-term resolution than if only one person in the situation had gotten his way.
5 - Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood
Use empathic listening to be genuinely influenced by a person, which compels them to reciprocate the listening and take an open mind to being influenced by you. This creates an atmosphere of caring, and positive problem solving.
6 - Synergize
Combine the strengths of people through positive teamwork, so as to achieve goals that no one could have done alone.

Continuous Improvements

The final habit is that of continuous improvement in both the personal and interpersonal spheres of influence.

7 - Sharpen the Saw
Balance and renew your resources, energy, and health to create a sustainable, long-term, effective lifestyle. It primarily emphasizes exercise for physical renewal, prayer (meditation, yoga, etc.) and good reading for mental renewal. It also mentions service to society for spiritual renewal.

Covey explains the "Upward Spiral" model in the sharpening the saw section. Through our conscience, along with meaningful and consistent progress, the spiral will result in growth, change, and constant improvement. In essence, one is always attempting to integrate and master the principles outlined in The 7 Habits at progressively higher levels at each iteration. Subsequent development on any habit will render a different experience and you will learn the principles with a deeper understanding. The Upward Spiral model consists of three parts: learn, commit, do. According to Covey, one must be increasingly educating the conscience in order to grow and develop on the upward spiral. The idea of renewal by education will propel one along the path of personal freedom, security, wisdom, and power.[2]

Sean Covey (Stephen's son) has written a version of the book for teens, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens. This version simplifies the 7 Habits for younger readers so they can better understand them. In September 2006, Sean Covey also published The 6 Most Important Decisions You Will Ever Make: A Guide for Teens. This guide highlights key times in the life of a teen and gives advice on how to deal with them.

Reception

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has sold more than 25 million copies in 40 languages worldwide, and the audio version has sold 1.5 million copies, and remains one of the best selling nonfiction business books. In August 2011 Time listed 7 Habits as one of "The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books".[3]

U.S. President Bill Clinton invited Covey to Camp David to counsel him on how to integrate the book into his presidency.[4]

It has been surmised that Covey, himself a practicing member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon),[5] discovered how to communicate Mormon truths to non-Mormons by simply changing the vocabulary and that his presumption of limitless potential is derived from the Mormon doctrine that people are gods in embryo stage.[6]

Abundance mentality

Covey coined the idea of abundance mentality or abundance mindset, a concept in which a person believes there are enough resources and successes to share with others. He contrasts it with the scarcity mindset (i.e., destructive and unnecessary competition), which is founded on the idea that, if someone else wins or is successful in a situation, that means you lose; not considering the possibility of all parties winning (in some way or another) in a given situation (see zero-sum game). Individuals with an abundance mentality reject the notion of zero-sum games and are able to celebrate the success of others rather than feel threatened by it.[7]

Since this book's publishing, a number of books appearing in the business press have discussed the idea.[8] Covey contends that the abundance mentality arises from having a high

  • Official Stephen Covey homepage
  • Video of the 7 habits in 3 Minutes.

External links

  1. ^ "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" author, Stephen Covey, dies". 
  2. ^ Covey, S. R. (1989). Organizing change:Upward Spiral. Free Press.  
  3. ^ Gandel, Stephen (August 9, 2011). "The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People (1989), by Stephen R. Covey in The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books". Time. Retrieved January 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ Harper, Lena M. (Summer 2012). "The Highly Effective Person". Marriott Alumni Magazine ( 
  5. ^ http://www.mormonwiki.com/Stephen_Covey
  6. ^ http://www.apologeticsindex.org/4554-closer-look-stephen-covey-7-habits
  7. ^ English, L (2004). "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Information Professionals, Part 7" (pdf). DM Review. September/October '04: 60–61. 
  8. ^ See for instance the chapter in Carolyn Simpson's High Performance through Negotiation.
  9. ^  
  10. ^ Krayer, Karl J.; Lee, William Thomas (2003). Organizing change: an inclusive, systemic approach to maintain productivity and achieve results. San Diego: Pfeiffer. p. 238.  

References

See also

[10]

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