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Armenian Rite

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Title: Armenian Rite  
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Subject: Roman Catholicism in Turkey, History of Roman Catholicism in France, History of Roman Catholicism in Germany, History of the Roman Curia, Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences
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Armenian Rite

The Armenian curtained main altar of Holy Etchmiadzin.

The Armenian Rite is an independent Republic of Georgia.

The liturgy is patterned after the directives of Saint Gregory the Illuminator, founder and patron saint of The Armenian Church. Unlike the Byzantine Church, churches of the Armenian rite are usually devoid of icons and have a curtain concealing the priest and the altar from the people during parts of the liturgy, an influence from early apostolic times. The use of bishop's mitre and of unleavened bread, is reminiscent of the influence Western missionaries once had upon both the miaphysite Orthodox Armenians as well as upon the Armenian Rite Catholics.

Celebration of the Eucharist

The order of the Armenian celebration of the Eucharist or Mass is initially influenced by the Syriac and Cappadocian Christians, then (from the 5th century A.D. onwards) by Jerusalemites, then by Byzantines (from ca. the 10th century) and lastly by the Latins in the Crusades. The Armenians are the only Eastern Church using wine without added water. The Armenians use unleavened bread for the Eucharist.

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