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Congressional Quarterly

Congressional Quarterly, Inc., or CQ, is part of a privately owned publishing company called CQ Roll Call that produces a number of publications reporting primarily on the United States Congress. CQ was acquired by the Economist Group and combined with Roll Call to form CQ Roll Call in 2009. As of 2009, CQ ceased to exist as a separate entity.

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • Awards 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Overview

Since April 2011, the merged CQ Roll Call has been located in the NoMa neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

CQ was founded in 1945 by executive branch.

Thomas N. Schroth, who had been managing editor of The Brooklyn Eagle, was elected in October 1955 as executive editor and vice president.[1] Schroth built the publication's impartial coverage, with annual revenue growing during his tenure from $150,000 when he started to $1.8 million. In addition to adding a book division, Schroth added many staff members who achieved future journalistic success, including David S. Broder, Neal R. Peirce, and Elizabeth Drew. He was fired from Congressional Quarterly in 1969 after festering disagreements with Poynter over editorial policy at the publication and Schroth's efforts to advocate "more imaginative ways of doing things" reached a boil.[2]

In 1965, Poynter summed up his reasons for founding CQ, saying: "The federal government will never set up an adequate agency to check on itself, and a foundation is too timid for that. So it had to be a private enterprise beholden to its clients" . Despite its name, CQ was published quarterly for only one year. Demand drove more frequent updates, first weekly, then daily. CQ was also an early leader in delivering information on a real-time basis, starting with a dial-up service in 1984. Its website dominates the market for online legislative tracking information and has been nominated for several awards. In recent years, CQ has launched several web-only newsletters with greater focus on particular areas, including CQ Homeland Security, CQ BudgetTracker, and "CQ HealthBeat".

In 2005, CQ's flagship publication, the Weekly Report, was re-launched as CQ Weekly with a wider focus, including "government, commerce and politics." A daily publication, CQ Today, also is available every day when Congress is in session. CQ Today's main print competition is Atlantic Media's CongressDaily.

Until 2009, CQ was owned by the Times Publishing Company of St. Petersburg, Fla., publisher of the Tampa Bay Times (formerly the St. Petersburg Times) and other publications. The Times Publishing Company is in turn owned by the Poynter Institute, a school for journalists founded by Nelson Poynter. The Economist Group acquired CQ; the terms of the deal were not disclosed.[3]

Awards

Eight CQ reporters have won the "Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress" from the

  • CQ Roll Call corporate website.

External links

  1. ^ Via United Press International. "Schroth Heads Quarterly", New York Times, October 30, 1955. Accessed August 5, 2009.
  2. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Thomas N. Schroth, Influential Washington Editor, Is Dead at 88", New York Times, August 4, 2009. Accessed August 5, 2009.
  3. ^ The Guardian, "The Economist Group Buys Congressional Quarterly", July 22, 2009
  4. ^ "Everett McKinley Dirksen Awards for Distinguished Reporting of Congress, Past Winners 1980-2008".  
  5. ^ "SAGE acquires CQ Press, Book-Publishing Unit of Congressional Quarterly Inc." (PDF). SAGE Publications. May 30, 2008. 

References

See also

In May 2008, CQ Press was purchased by SAGE Publications in its entirety.[5] Although it retains the name "CQ Press" (a trademark of Congressional Quarterly), CQ Press is no longer an affiliate of Congressional Quarterly.

In 1999, CQ Executive Conferences was transferred to TheCapitol.Net, a non-partisan firm based in Alexandria, Virginia. TheCapitol.Net is no longer an affiliate of Congressional Quarterly.

[4]

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