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Conservative Manifesto

 

Conservative Manifesto

The Conservative Manifesto (officially titled "An Address to the People of the United States" ) was a position statement drafted in 1937 by a bipartisan coalition of conservative politicians. Those involved in its creation included opponents of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal as well as erstwhile supporters who had come to believe its programs were proving ineffective.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Manifesto 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Background

The spring and summer of 1937 saw a return to economic recession (dubbed the "


  • "Conservative Manifesto" from the North Carolina History Project
  • , 51 Duke L. J. 165 (2001)The New Deal Constitution in ExileWilliam E. Forbath,

External links

  1. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the "Conservative Manifesto" of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 22–23, 27.  
  2. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 23.  
  3. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 30.  
  4. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 32.  
  5. ^ Catledge, Turner (16 December 1937). "10 Points Drafted; Attempt Made to Unite All Conservatives and Moderates on Plan; Many Reluctant to Sign; Handicap for Movement Seen in Fear That Document May Look Like a Manifesto". The New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 7 August 2011. 
  6. ^ Kickler, Troy. "North Carolina History Project". The Conservative Manifesto. Retrieved 7 August 2011. 
  7. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 23.  
  8. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 38.  
  9. ^ Moore, John Robert (February 1965). "Senator Josiah W. Bailey and the 'Conservative Manifesto' of 1937". The Journal of Southern History 31 (1): 34.  

References

  1. lowering taxes on capital gains and undistributed profits,
  2. reducing government spending and balancing budgets,
  3. restoring peace to the relationship between labor and industry,
  4. resisting government competition with private enterprise,
  5. recognizing the importance of profit in private enterprise,
  6. protecting collateral as a prerequisite for credit,
  7. reducing taxes,
  8. maintaining states' rights,
  9. aiding the unemployed in an economical and locally responsible manner, and
  10. relying on American free enterprise.[9]

The statement called for:

Manifesto

[8] Portions of the statement were published prematurely by syndicated columnists

[3]), with Bailey acting as "final editor."MI-R (Arthur H. Vandenberg The document's key authors were Bailey and [2]) recognized an opportunity to oppose the New Deal through "bipartisan conservative action."NC-D (Josiah W. Bailey A bipartisan coalition of conservative politicians emerged in light of these political developments, and Senator [1]

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