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Duranguense

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Title: Duranguense  
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Subject: Regional styles of Mexican music, Norteño (music), Disa Records, Duranguense, Regional Mexican Albums
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Duranguense

Duranguense (also known as pasito duranguense) is a genre of Mexican music. It is popular among the Mexican-American community in the United States. Duranguense is closely related to the Mexican styles of banda and norteño. The main instruments, which are held over from banda, are the saxophone, trombone, and bass drum. However, what sets the duranguense ensemble apart from banda is the addition of synthesizers to play both melodies and the tuba bassline. The tempo is also noticeably faster than banda or norteño. Among the duranguense elements carried over from other genres is el tamborazo; a heavy percussion line consisting of the bass drum and varied snare drum rolls.

History

The term duranguense refers to the people from Durango, Mexico. Grupo Montéz de Durango were believed to be the very first to begin the movement. Teenagers are forming new Duranguense bands like never before, playing at night clubs, weddings, quinceañera, and family get togethers. A group of immigrants from Durango started a Duranguense group called Patrulla 81; from there it started to expand into other states and Mexico. Most Duranguense bands have been founded by Mexican-American immigrants in the United States.

It was not until the early 2000s Grupo Montéz de Durango, one of the best-known Duranguense bands, topped the Latin music charts. Their CD, De Durango a Chicago, was a best-seller and had been a top 10 music bestseller in Chicago on Amazon.com. Patrulla 81's hits ¿Cómo Pude Enamorarme de Ti? Un exito cover antes cantado por los liricos de teran, and No Aprendí a Olvidar were also hugely successful hits on regional Mexican radio stations.

Duranguense artists


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External links

  • History and description of Duranguense
  • New York Times article on Duranguense band
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