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Electricity

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Electricity

/a>, which unify light, fields, and charge are one of the great milestones of theoretical physics.[17]:696–700

Thus, the work of many researchers enabled the use of electronics to convert signals into high frequency oscillating currents, and via suitably shaped conductors, electricity permits the transmission and reception of these signals via radio waves over very long distances.

Production and uses

Generation and transmission

Main article: Electricity generation. See also: Electric power transmission and Mains electricity.
Early 20th-century alternator made in Budapest, Hungary, in the power generating hall of a hydroelectric station (photograph by Prokudin-Gorsky, 1905–1915).

Thales' experiments with amber rods were the first studies into the production of electrical energy. While this method, now known as the triboelectric effect, can lift light objects and generate sparks, it is extremely inefficient.[48] It was not until the invention of the voltaic pile in the eighteenth century that a viable source of electricity became available. The voltaic pile, and its modern descendant, the electrical battery, store energy chemically and make it available on demand in the form of electrical energy.[48] The battery is a versatile and very common power source which is ideally suited to many applications, but its energy storage is finite, and once discharged it must be disposed of or recharged. For large electrical demands electrical energy must be generated and transmitted continuously over conductive transmission lines.

Electrical power is usually generated by electro-mechanical generators driven by steam produced from fossil fuel combustion, or the heat released from nuclear reactions; or from other sources such as kinetic energy extracted from wind or flowing water. The modern steam turbine invented by Sir Charles Parsons in 1884 today generates about 80 percent of the electric power in the world using a variety of heat sources. Such generators bear no resemblance to Faraday's homopolar disc generator of 1831, but they still rely on his electromagnetic principle that a conductor linking a changing magnetic field induces a potential difference across its ends.[49] The invention in the late nineteenth century of the transformer meant that electrical power could be transmitted more efficiently at a higher voltage but lower current. Efficient electrical transmission meant in turn that electricity could be generated at centralised power stations, where it benefited from economies of scale, and then be despatched relatively long distances to where it was needed.[50][51]

A wind farm of about a dozen three-bladed white wind turbines.
Wind power is of increasing importance in many countries

Since electrical energy cannot easily be stored in quantities large enough to meet demands on a national scale, at all times exactly as much must be produced as is required.[50] This requires electricity utilities to make careful predictions of their electrical loads, and maintain constant co-ordination with their power stations. A certain amount of generation must always be held in reserve to cushion an electrical grid against inevitable disturbances and losses.

Demand for electricity grows with great rapidity as a nation modernises and its economy develops. The United States showed a 12% increase in demand during each year of the first three decades of the twentieth century,[52] a rate of growth that is now being experienced by emerging economies such as those of India or China.[53][54] Historically, the growth rate for electricity demand has outstripped that for other forms of energy.[55]:16

Environmental concerns with electricity generation have led to an increased focus on generation from renewable sources, in particular from wind and hydropower. While debate can be expected to continue over the environmental impact of different means of electricity production, its final form is relatively clean[55]:89

Applications

The light bulb, an early application of electricity, operates by Joule heating: the passage of current through resistance generating heat

Electricity is a very convenient way to transfer energy, and it has been adapted to a huge, and growing, number of uses.[56] The invention of a practical incandescent light bulb in the 1870s led to lighting becoming one of the first publicly available applications of electrical power. Although electrification brought with it its own dangers, replacing the naked flames of gas lighting greatly reduced fire hazards within homes and factories.[57] Public utilities were set up in many cities targeting the burgeoning market for electrical lighting.

The Joule heating effect employed in the light bulb also sees more direct use in electric heating. While this is versatile and controllable, it can be seen as wasteful, since most electrical generation has already required the production of heat at a power station.[58] A number of countries, such as Denmark, have issued legislation restricting or banning the use of electric heating in new buildings.[59] Electricity is however a highly practical energy source for refrigeration,[60] with air conditioning representing a growing sector for electricity demand, the effects of which electricity utilities are increasingly obliged to accommodate.[61]

Electricity is used within telecommunications, and indeed the electrical telegraph, demonstrated commercially in 1837 by Cooke and Wheatstone, was one of its earliest applications. With the construction of first intercontinental, and then transatlantic, telegraph systems in the 1860s, electricity had enabled communications in minutes across the globe. Optical fibre and satellite communication have taken a share of the market for communications systems, but electricity can be expected to remain an essential part of the process.

The effects of electromagnetism are most visibly employed in the electric motor, which provides a clean and efficient means of motive power. A stationary motor such as a winch is easily provided with a supply of power, but a motor that moves with its application, such as an electric vehicle, is obliged to either carry along a power source such as a battery, or to collect current from a sliding contact such as a pantograph.

Electronic devices make use of the transistor, perhaps one of the most important inventions of the twentieth century,[62] and a fundamental building block of all modern circuitry. A modern integrated circuit may contain several billion miniaturised transistors in a region only a few centimetres square.[63]

Electricity is also used to fuel public transportation, including electric buses and trains. [64]

Electricity and the natural world

Physiological effects

A voltage applied to a human body causes an electric current through the tissues, and although the relationship is non-linear, the greater the voltage, the greater the current.[65] The threshold for perception varies with the supply frequency and with the path of the current, but is about 0.1 mA to 1 mA for mains-frequency electricity, though a current as low as a microamp can be detected as an electrovibration effect under certain conditions.[66] If the current is sufficiently high, it will cause muscle contraction, fibrillation of the heart, and tissue burns.[65] The lack of any visible sign that a conductor is electrified makes electricity a particular hazard. The pain caused by an electric shock can be intense, leading electricity at times to be employed as a method of torture. Death caused by an electric shock is referred to as electrocution. Electrocution is still the means of judicial execution in some jurisdictions, though its use has become rarer in recent times.[67]

Electrical phenomena in nature

The electric eel, Electrophorus electricus

Electricity is not a human invention, and may be observed in several forms in nature, a prominent manifestation of which is lightning. Many interactions familiar at the macroscopic level, such as touch, friction or chemical bonding, are due to interactions between electric fields on the atomic scale. The Earth's magnetic field is thought to arise from a natural dynamo of circulating currents in the planet's core.[68] Certain crystals, such as quartz, or even sugar, generate a potential difference across their faces when subjected to external pressure.[69] This phenomenon is known as piezoelectricity, from the Greek piezein (πιέζειν), meaning to press, and was discovered in 1880 by Pierre and Jacques Curie. The effect is reciprocal, and when a piezoelectric material is subjected to an electric field, a small change in physical dimensions takes place.[69]

Some organisms, such as sharks, are able to detect and respond to changes in electric fields, an ability known as electroreception,[70] while others, termed electrogenic, are able to generate voltages themselves to serve as a predatory or defensive weapon.[3] The order Gymnotiformes, of which the best known example is the electric eel, detect or stun their prey via high voltages generated from modified muscle cells called electrocytes.[3][4] All animals transmit information along their cell membranes with voltage pulses called action potentials, whose functions include communication by the nervous system between neurons and muscles.[71] An electric shock stimulates this system, and causes muscles to contract.[72] Action potentials are also responsible for coordinating activities in certain plants.[71]

Cultural perception

In 1850, William Gladstone asked the scientist Michael Faraday why electricity was valuable. Faraday answered, “One day sir, you may tax it.”[73]

In the 19th and early 20th century, electricity was not part of the everyday life of many people, even in the industrialised Western world. The popular culture of the time accordingly often depicts it as a mysterious, quasi-magical force that can slay the living, revive the dead or otherwise bend the laws of nature.[74] This attitude began with the 1771 experiments of Luigi Galvani in which the legs of dead frogs were shown to twitch on application of animal electricity. "Revitalization" or resuscitation of apparently dead or drowned persons was reported in the medical literature shortly after Galvani's work. These results were known to Mary Shelley when she authored Frankenstein (1819), although she does not name the method of revitalization of the monster. The revitalization of monsters with electricity later became a stock theme in horror films.

As the public familiarity with electricity as the lifeblood of the Second Industrial Revolution grew, its wielders were more often cast in a positive light,[75] such as the workers who "finger death at their gloves' end as they piece and repiece the living wires" in Rudyard Kipling's 1907 poem Sons of Martha.[75] Electrically powered vehicles of every sort featured large in adventure stories such as those of Jules Verne and the Tom Swift books.[75] The masters of electricity, whether fictional or real—including scientists such as Thomas Edison, Charles Steinmetz or Nikola Tesla—were popularly conceived of as having wizard-like powers.[75]

With electricity ceasing to be a novelty and becoming a necessity of everyday life in the later half of the 20th century, it required particular attention by popular culture only when it stops flowing,[75] an event that usually signals disaster.[75] The people who keep it flowing, such as the nameless hero of Jimmy Webb’s song "Wichita Lineman" (1968),[75] are still often cast as heroic, wizard-like figures.[75]

See also

Notes

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  2. ^ Moller, Peter; Kramer, Bernd (December 1991), "Review: Electric Fish", BioScience (American Institute of Biological Sciences) 41 (11): 794–6 [794],  
  3. ^ a b c Bullock, Theodore H. (2005), Electroreception, Springer, pp. 5–7,  
  4. ^ a b Morris, Simon C. (2003), Life's Solution: Inevitable Humans in a Lonely Universe, Cambridge University Press, pp. 182–185,  
  5. ^ The Encyclopedia Americana; a library of universal knowledge (1918), New York: Encyclopedia Americana Corp
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  11. ^ Srodes, James (2002), Franklin: The Essential Founding Father, Regnery Publishing, pp. 92–94,   It is uncertain if Franklin personally carried out this experiment, but it is popularly attributed to him.
  12. ^  
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  23. ^ "The repulsive force between two small spheres charged with the same type of electricity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the centres of the two spheres." Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, Histoire de l'Academie Royal des Sciences, Paris 1785.
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  35. ^ "EMI Reduction - Unsuppressed vs. Suppressed"Lab Note #105 . Arc Suppression Technologies. April 2011. Retrieved March 7, 2012. 
  36. ^ a b c Bird, John (2007), Electrical and Electronic Principles and Technology, 3rd edition, Newnes,  
  37. ^ Almost all electric fields vary in space. An exception is the electric field surrounding a planar conductor of infinite extent, the field of which is uniform.
  38. ^ a b Morely & Hughes, Principles of Electricity, Fifth edition, p. 73,  
  39. ^ Naidu, M.S.; Kamataru, V. (1982), High Voltage Engineering, Tata McGraw-Hill, p. 2,  
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  49. ^
  50. ^ a b Patterson, Walter C. (1999), Transforming Electricity: The Coming Generation of Change, Earthscan, pp. 44–48,  
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  52. ^ Edison Electric Institute, History of the U.S. Electric Power Industry, 1882-1991, retrieved 2007-12-08 
  53. ^ Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, An Energy Summary of India, archived from the original on 2007-12-05, retrieved 2007-12-08 
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  55. ^ a b  
  56. ^ Wald, Matthew (21 March 1990), "Growing Use of Electricity Raises Questions on Supply", New York Times, retrieved 2007-12-09 
  57. ^ d'Alroy Jones, Peter, The Consumer Society: A History of American Capitalism, Penguin Books, p. 211 
  58. ^ ReVelle, Charles and Penelope (1992), The Global Environment: Securing a Sustainable Future, Jones & Bartlett, p. 298,  
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  62. ^ Herrick, Dennis F. (2003), Media Management in the Age of Giants: Business Dynamics of Journalism, Blackwell Publishing,  
  63. ^ Das, Saswato R. (2007-12-15), "The tiny, mighty transistor", Los Angeles Times 
  64. ^ "Public Transportation", Alternative Energy News, 2010-03-10 
  65. ^ a b Tleis, Nasser (2008), Power System Modelling and Fault Analysis, Elsevier, pp. 552–554,  
  66. ^ Grimnes, Sverre (2000), Bioimpedance and Bioelectricity Basic, Academic Press, pp. 301–309,  
  67. ^ Lipschultz, J.H.; Hilt, M.L.J.H. (2002), Crime and Local Television News, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, p. 95,  
  68. ^ Encrenaz, Thérèse (2004), The Solar System, Springer, p. 217,  
  69. ^ a b Lima-de-Faria, José; Buerger, Martin J. (1990), Historical Atlas of Crystallography, Springer, p. 67,  
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References

  • Nahvi, Mahmood; Joseph, Edminister (1965), Electric Circuits, McGraw-Hill,  
  • Hammond, Percy (1981), "Electromagnetism for Engineers", Nature (Pergamon) 168 (4262): 4,  
  • Morely, A.; Hughes, E. (1994), Principles of Electricity (5th ed.), Longman,  
  • Naidu, M.S.; Kamataru, V. (1982), High Voltage Engineering, Tata McGraw-Hill,  
  • Nilsson, James; Riedel, Susan (2007), Electric Circuits, Prentice Hall,  
  • Patterson, Walter C. (1999), Transforming Electricity: The Coming Generation of Change, Earthscan,  
  • Benjamin, P. (1898). A history of electricity (The intellectual rise in electricity) from antiquity to the days of Benjamin Franklin. New York: J. Wiley & Sons.

External links

  • "One-Hundred Years of Electricity", May 1931, Popular Mechanics
  • Illustrated view of how an American home's electrical system works
  • Electricity around the world
  • Electricity Misconceptions
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Understanding Electricity and Electronics in about 10 Minutes
  • World Bank report on Water, Electricity and Utility subsidies
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