Folk/blues

Country blues (Acoustic Blues)
Stylistic origins Blues, folk, country
Cultural origins Southern US, early 20th century
Typical instruments Guitar, Harmonica
Derivative forms Chicago blues, Detroit blues, Electric blues, Memphis blues, New Orleans blues, Swamp blues, Hill country blues
Subgenres
Delta blues, Louisiana blues, Piedmont blues

Country blues otherwise known as acoustic blues (also folk blues, rural blues, backwoods blues, or downhome blues) is a general term that refers to all the acoustic, mainly guitar-driven forms of the blues. It often incorporated elements of rural gospel, ragtime, hillbilly, and dixieland jazz. After blues' birth in the Southern United States, it quickly spread throughout the country (and elsewhere), giving birth to a host of regional styles. These include Memphis, Detroit, Chicago, Texas, Piedmont, Louisiana, West Coast, Atlanta, St. Louis, East Coast, Swamp, New Orleans, Delta, Hill country and Kansas City blues.[1][2]

When African-American musical tastes began to change in the early 1960s, moving toward soul and rhythm and blues music, country blues found renewed popularity as "folk blues" and was sold to a primarily white, college-age audience. Traditional artists like Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson II reinvented themselves as folk blues artists, while Piedmont bluesmen like Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee found great success on the folk festival circuit.[3]

Listen

Acoustic blues last.fm

See also

References

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