Indian-Pakistani border

The India–Pakistan Border (Hindi: इंडिया-पाकिस्तान बोर्डर, Urdu: انڈیا-پاکستان بورڈر‎), known locally as the International Border (IB), is an international border running between India and Pakistan that demarcates the Indian states and the four provinces of Pakistan. The border is running from the Line of Control (LoC), which separates the Indian Jammu Kashmir and Azad Kashmir of Pakistan, in the north, to Wagha line, which partitioned the Indian Punjab state and Punjab Province of Pakistan, in the eastward. The Zero Point separates the Indian states of Gujarat and Rajasthan to Sindh province of Pakistan, in the southward.[1]

Drafted and created based upon the artificial Radcliffe line in 1947, the border, separating Pakistan and India from each other, traverses a variety of terrains, ranging from major urban areas to inhospitable deserts.[2] From the Arabian sea, the naval border follows the course of Manora Island of Pakistan to the course of the Mumbai Harbour, in the South eastward. Since independence of India and Pakistan, the border has been a site of numerous conflict and wars between each country, and is one of the most complex border in the world.[2] The border's total length is 1,800 mi (2,900 km),[2] according the figures given by the PBS; it is also one of the most dangerous borders in the world, based on an article written in the Foreign Policy in 2011.[3]

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