Japan national association football team

Japan
Nickname(s) サムライ・ブルー
(Samurai Blue)
Association 日本サッカー協会
(Japan Football Association)
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Head coach Javier Aguirre
Captain Makoto Hasebe
Most caps Yasuhito Endō (148)
Top scorer Kunishige Kamamoto (80)
FIFA code JPN
FIFA ranking 53 1 (27 November 2014)
Highest FIFA ranking 9 (February 1998)
Lowest FIFA ranking 66 (December 1992)
Elo ranking 29 (9 July 2014)
Highest Elo ranking 8 (August 2001, March 2002)
Lowest Elo ranking 112 (September 1962)
First international

(Tokyo; 9 May 1917)
Biggest win

(Tokyo; 27 September 1967)
Biggest defeat

(Tokyo; 10 May 1917)
World Cup
Appearances 5 (First in 1998)
Best result Round of 16: 2002 and 2010
Asian Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1988)
Best result Champions: 1992, 2000, 2004 and 2011
Copa América
Appearances 1 (First in 1999)
Best result Group Stage: 1999
Confederations Cup
Appearances 4 (First in 1995)
Best result Runners-up: 2001

The Japan national football team (サッカー日本代表 Soccer Nippon Daihyō) represents Japan in association football and is operated by the Japan Football Association (JFA), the governing body for association football in Japan. Their head coach is Javier Aguirre.

Japan is one of the most successful football teams in Asia, having qualified for the last five consecutive FIFA World Cups with second round advancements in 2002 & 2010, and having won the AFC Asian Cup a record four times in 1992, 2000, 2004 & 2011. The team has also finished second in the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup.

The Japanese team is commonly known by the fans and media as Soccer Nippon Daihyō (サッカー日本代表), Nippon Daihyō (日本代表), or Daihyō (代表) as abbreviated expressions. Although the team does not have an official nickname as such, it is often known by the name of the manager. For example, under Takeshi Okada, the team was known as Okada Japan (岡田ジャパン Okada Japan).[1] Recently the team has been known or nicknamed as the "Samurai Blue", while Japanese news media still refer it to by manager's last name, as "Zaccheroni Japan" (ザッケローニジャパン Zakkerōni Japan), or "Zac Japan" (ザックジャパン Zakku Japan) in short.

History

Japan against Brazil at Signal Iduna Park in Dortmund, Germany in the 2006 FIFA World Cup

Japan's first major achievement in international football came in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, where the team won the bronze medal. Although this result earned the sport increased recognition in Japan, the absence of a professional domestic league hindered its growth and Japan would not qualify for the FIFA World Cup until 30 years later.[2]

In 1991, the owners of the semi-professional Japan Soccer League agreed to disband the league and re-form as the professional J. League, partly to raise the sport's profile and to strengthen the national team program. With the launch of the new league in 1993, interest in football and the national team grew.

However, in its first attempt to qualify with professional players, Japan narrowly missed a ticket to the 1994 FIFA World Cup after drawing with Iraq in the final match of the qualification round, remembered by fans as the Agony of Doha.

The nation's first ever FIFA World Cup appearance was in 1998. Japan's first two fixtures went 1–0 in favor of Argentina and Croatia, despite playing well in both games. Their campaign ended with a 2–1 defeat to Jamaica.

Four years later, Japan co-hosted the 2002 FIFA World Cup with South Korea. After a 2–2 draw with Belgium in their opening game, the Japanese team advanced to the second round with a 1–0 win over Russia and a 2–0 victory against Tunisia. However, they subsequently exited the tournament during the Round of 16, after losing 1–0 to eventual third-place finishers Turkey.

On June 8, 2005, Japan qualified for the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, its third consecutive World Cup, by beating North Korea 2–0 on neutral ground. However, Japan failed to advance to the Round of 16, losing to Australia 1–3, drawing Croatia 0–0 and losing to Brazil 1–4.

Japan has had much success in the Asian Cup, taking home the winner's trophy in four of the last six finals, in 1992, 2000, 2004 and 2011. Their principal continental rivals are South Korea, followed by Saudi Arabia, and most recently Australia.

Japan is the only team from outside the Americas to participate in the Copa América, having been invited in 1999 and 2011.[3]

During the 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification, in the fourth round of the Asian Qualifiers, Japan became the first team other than the host South Africa to qualify after defeating Uzbekistan 1–0 away. Japan was put in Group E along with the Netherlands, Denmark and Cameroon.[4] Japan won its opening game of the 2010 FIFA World Cup defeating Cameroon 1–0 but subsequently lost to the Netherlands 0–1 before defeating Denmark 3–1 to advance to the next round against Paraguay. In the first knockout round Japan were eliminated from the competition following penalties after a 0–0 draw against Paraguay.

After the World Cup, head coach Takeshi Okada resigned. He was replaced by former Juventus and AC Milan coach Alberto Zaccheroni. In his first few matches, Japan recorded victories over Guatemala (2–1) and Paraguay (1–0), as well as one of their best ever results – a 1–0 victory over Argentina.

At the start of 2011 Japan participated in the 2011 AFC Asian Cup in Qatar. On 29 January, they beat Australia 1–0 in the final after extra time, their fourth Asian Cup triumph and allowing them to qualify for FIFA Confederations Cup.[5]

Japan then started their road to World Cup 2014 Brazil with numerous qualifiers. Throughout they suffered only two losses to Uzbekistan and Jordan, and drawing against Australia. Afterwards on October 12, Japan picked up a historic 1–0 victory over France, a team they had never before defeated. After a 1–1 draw with Australia they qualified for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, becoming the first nation (outside of Brazil, who is hosting the tournament) to qualify.

Japan started their 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup with a 3–0 loss to Brazil. They were then eliminated from the competition after losing to Italy 3–4 in a hard fought match but received praise for their style of play in the match. They lost their final game 1-2 against Mexico and finished 4th place in Group A in the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup. One month later, in the EAFF East Asian Cup, they started out with a 3-3 draw to China. They then beat Australia 3-2 and beat South Korea 2-1 in the 3rd and final match in the 2013 EAFF East Asian Cup to claim the title. The road to Brazil looked bright as Japan managed a 2-2 draw with the Netherlands and a 2-3 victory over Belgium. This was followed by three straight wins against Cyprus, Costa Rica and Zambia.

They came into the FIFA World Cup 2014 grouped with Ivory Coast, Greece, and Colombia. They fell in their first match to Ivory Coast 2-1 despite initially taking the lead, allowing two goals in a two-minute span. They drew their second game to Greece 0-0. To qualify for the second round they needed a victory against Colombia and needed Greece to beat Ivory Coast. Greece beat Ivory Coast 2-1 but Japan could not perform well against Colombia and were beaten 4-1, eliminating them from the World Cup. Alberto Zaccheroni resigned as head coach after the FIFA World Cup. In July of 2014, former Mexico and Espanyol manager Javier Aguirre took over and Japan lost 0-2 to Uruguay in the first game he managed.

Javier Aguirre would begin a strong revamp of the team, switching out Zaccheroni's long used 4-2-3-1 formation for his own 4-3-3 and applied this with a roster of the J-League's finest, dropping many regulars. A 2-2 draw against Venezuela was followed by a 1-0 victory over Jamaica. The J-League call-ups then showed their quality against a strong Brazil roster, holding the World Cup hosts to a 0-1 deficit until half-time. Neymar would however over-power the inexperienced team and complete his 0-4 rout through the second half. Japan's sights turned to January and their title defense at the 2015 AFC Asian Cup.

Team image

Fan Chanting

Japanese national team supporters are known for chanting "Nippon Ole" (Nippon is the Japanese term for Japan) at home matches.[6]

Kits and colours

Japan's current kit is provided by German company Adidas, the team's official apparel sponsor since 1986. The current contract with Adidas is set to end on March 31, 2015. [7]

The current home kit consists of a blue jersey with Japan's crest and flag on the chest, blue shorts with bright pink patches on the side and blue socks with pink tops. The away kit is neon yellow, accented with navy blue and orange. In 2011, Japan temporarily switched the color of the numbers from white to gold.

Prior to Adidas, Asics and Puma had been the team's official apparel sponsor. The national team kit design has gone through several alterations in the past. In the early 80s, the kit was white with blue trim. When Japan was coached by Kenzo Yokoyama (1988–1991) the kits were red and white, matching the colors of Japan's national flag. The kits worn for the 1992 AFC Asian Cup consisted of white stripes (stylized to form a wing) with red diamonds. During Japan's first World Cup appearance in 1998, the national team kits were blue jerseys with red and white flame designs on the sleeves, and were designed by JFA (with the sponsor alternating each year between Asics, Puma and Adidas).

Japan uses blue and white rather than red and white due to a superstition. In its first major international competition, the 1936 Summer Olympics, Japan used a blue kit in the match against Sweden and Japan won the match by a score of 3–2.[8]

Home
1917
1950-1975
1975-1979
1979-1980
1980-1983
1983-1986
1986-1987
1988–91
1991-1992
1992–96
1996–98
1999–2000
2001
2002–03
2004–05
2006–07
2008–09
2010–11
2012–13
2014–
Away
1980-1981
1984-1985
1985
1999–2000
2001
2002–03
2004–05
2006–07
2008–09
2010–11
2012–13
2014–

Sponsorship

Japan has one of the highest sponsorship incomes for a national squad. In 2006 their sponsorship income amounted to over 16.5 million pounds.

Primary sponsors include Adidas, Kirin, Saison Card International, FamilyMart, JAL, Mitsui Sumitomo Insurance, Sony, Asahi Shinbun, Konami, Mizuho Financial and Audi.[9]

Mascot

The mascots are "Karappe" (カラッペ) and "Karara" (カララ), two Yatagarasu wearing the Japan national football team uniform. The mascots were designed by Japanese manga artist Susumu Matsushita. Each year when a new kit is launched, the mascots change uniforms.

Competitive record

All time results

Recent results and fixtures

Date Opponent Result Score* Venue Competition
5 Mar 2014 New Zealand W 4–2 National Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
27 May 2014 Cyprus W 1–0 Saitama Stadium 2002, Saitama, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
2 Jun 2014 Costa Rica W 3–1 Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Florida, United States [10] International Friendly
6 Jun 2014 Zambia W 4–3 Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Florida, United States International Friendly
14 Jun 2014 Ivory Coast L 1–2 Arena Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil 2014 FIFA World Cup
19 Jun 2014 Greece D 0–0 Arena das Dunas, Natal, Brazil 2014 FIFA World Cup
24 Jun 2014 Colombia L 1–4 Arena Pantanal, Cuiabá, Brazil 2014 FIFA World Cup
5 Sep 2014 Uruguay L 0–2 Sapporo Dome, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
9 Sep 2014 Venezuela W 3–0[11] Nissan Stadium, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
10 Oct 2014 Jamaica W 1–0 Denka Big Swan Stadium, Niigata, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
14 Oct 2014 Brazil L 0–4 Singapore National Stadium, Singapore International Friendly
14 Nov 2014 Honduras W 6–0 Toyota Stadium, Toyota, Aichi, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
18 Nov 2014 Australia W 2–1 Nagai Stadium, Osaka, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2014)
12 Jan 2015 Palestine Newcastle Stadium, Newcastle, Australia 2015 AFC Asian Cup
16 Jan 2015 Iraq Brisbane Stadium, Brisbane, Australia 2015 AFC Asian Cup
20 Jan 2015 Jordan Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, Melbourne, Australia 2015 AFC Asian Cup
23 Mar 2015 Algeria Saitama Stadium 2002, Saitama, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2015)
31 Mar 2015 Senegal National Olympic Stadium, Tokyo,Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2015)
12 May 2015 Belarus TBA Kirin Cup 2015
17 May 2015 Ecuador TBA Kirin Cup 2015
14 Nov 2015 France Nissan Stadium, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan International Friendly (Kirin Challenge Cup 2015)


* Japan score always listed first

      Win       Draw       Loss

Coaching

Position Name
Head Coach Javier Aguirre
Assistant Coach Alfredo Tena
Assistant Coach Miguel Rivera
Assistant Coach Stuart Gelling
Fitness Coach Juan Iribarren
Goalkeeping Coach Ricardo
Technical Assistant Makoto Teguramori
Technical Assistant Naoki Hayakawa

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were called up for the international friendly matches against Honduras on 14 November and Australia on 18 November 2014.

Caps and goals as of 18 November 2014, after match against Australia.
0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Eiji Kawashima (1983-03-20) 20 March 1983 64 0 Standard Liège
12 1GK Shusaku Nishikawa (1986-06-18) 18 June 1986 15 0 Urawa Red Diamonds
23 1GK Masaaki Higashiguchi (1986-05-12) 12 May 1986 0 0 Gamba Osaka
15 2DF Yasuyuki Konno (1983-01-25) 25 January 1983 84 2 Gamba Osaka
2 2DF Atsuto Uchida (1988-03-27) 27 March 1988 73 2 Schalke 04
22 2DF Maya Yoshida (1988-08-24) 24 August 1988 49 3 Southampton
3 2DF Gōtoku Sakai (1991-03-14) 14 March 1991 19 0 Stuttgart
21 2DF Kosuke Ota (1987-07-23) 23 July 1987 3 0 FC Tokyo
16 2DF Tsukasa Shiotani (1988-12-05) 5 December 1988 2 0 Sanfrecce Hiroshima
18 2DF Gen Shoji (1992-12-11) 11 December 1992 0 0 Kashima Antlers
5 2DF Ken Matsubara (1993-02-16) 16 February 1993 0 0 Albirex Niigata
7 3MF Yasuhito Endō (1980-01-28) 28 January 1980 148 14 Gamba Osaka
17 3MF Makoto Hasebe (captain) (1984-01-18) 18 January 1984 83 2 Eintracht Frankfurt
10 3MF Shinji Kagawa (1989-03-17) 17 March 1989 63 19 Borussia Dortmund
6 3MF Masato Morishige (1987-05-21) 21 May 1987 17 1 FC Tokyo
8 3MF Takashi Inui (1988-06-02) 2 June 1988 14 2 Eintracht Frankfurt
14 3MF Yoshinori Muto (1992-07-15) 15 July 1992 6 1 FC Tokyo
20 3MF Gaku Shibasaki (1992-05-28) 28 May 1992 4 1 Kashima Antlers
13 3MF Taishi Taguchi (1991-03-16) 16 March 1991 3 0 Nagoya Grampus
19 3MF Ryota Morioka (1991-04-12) 12 April 1991 2 0 Vissel Kobe
9 4FW Shinji Okazaki (1986-04-16) 16 April 1986 84 40 Mainz 05
4 4FW Keisuke Honda (1986-06-13) 13 June 1986 65 24 Milan
11 4FW Yōhei Toyoda (1985-04-11) 11 April 1985 6 1 Sagan Tosu

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Japan squad within the last 12 months.
Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Shūichi Gonda (1989-03-03) 3 March 1989 2 0 FC Tokyo v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
GK Akihiro Hayashi (1987-05-07) 7 May 1987 0 0 Sagan Tosu v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
GK Takuto Hayashi (1982-08-09) 9 August 1982 0 0 Sanfrecce Hiroshima 2014 FIFA World Cup (standby)[12]
DF Yuto Nagatomo (1986-09-12) 12 September 1986 76 3 Internazionale v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
DF Hiroki Mizumoto (1985-09-12) 12 September 1985 6 0 Sanfrecce Hiroshima v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
DF Daisuke Suzuki (1990-01-29) 29 January 1990 2 0 Kashiwa Reysol v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
DF Daigo Nishi (1987-08-28) 28 August 1987 1 0 Kashima Antlers v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
DF Hiroki Sakai (1990-04-12) 12 April 1990 19 0 Hannover 96 v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
DF Tatsuya Sakai (1990-11-19) 19 November 1990 1 0 Sagan Tosu v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
DF Masahiko Inoha (1985-08-28) 28 August 1985 21 1 Júbilo Iwata 2014 FIFA World Cup
DF Yūichi Komano (1981-07-25) 25 July 1981 78 1 Júbilo Iwata 2014 FIFA World Cup (standby)[12]
MF Hajime Hosogai (1986-06-10) 10 June 1986 30 1 Hertha Berlin v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
MF Junya Tanaka (1987-07-15) 15 July 1987 4 0 Sporting v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
MF Takahiro Ogihara (1991-10-05) 5 October 1991 1 0 Cerezo Osaka v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
MF Hiroshi Kiyotake (1989-11-12) 12 November 1989 26 1 Hannover 96 2014 FIFA World Cup
MF (1990-10-06) 6 October 1990 15 0 Cerezo Osaka 2014 FIFA World Cup
MF Toshihiro Aoyama (1986-02-22) 22 February 1986 7 0 Sanfrecce Hiroshima 2014 FIFA World Cup
MF (1990-04-04) 4 April 1990 5 1 Yokohama F. Marinos 2014 FIFA World Cup
MF Kengo Nakamura (1980-10-31) 31 October 1980 68 6 Kawasaki Frontale 2014 FIFA World Cup (standby)[12]
MF Hideto Takahashi (1987-10-17) 17 October 1987 7 0 FC Tokyo v. Netherlands, 16 November 2013
FW Yoichiro Kakitani (1990-01-03) 3 January 1990 18 5 Basel v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
FW Mike Havenaar (1987-05-20) 20 May 1987 17 4 Córdoba v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
FW (1987-09-23) 23 September 1987 2 0 Kawasaki Frontale v. Brazil, 14 October 2014
FW Yūya Ōsako (1990-05-18) 18 May 1990 12 3 Köln v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
FW Yusuke Minagawa (1991-10-09) 9 October 1991 1 0 Sanfrecce Hiroshima v. Venezuela, 9 September 2014
FW Yoshito Ōkubo (1982-06-09) 9 June 1982 60 6 Kawasaki Frontale 2014 FIFA World Cup
FW Takumi Minamino (1995-01-16) 16 January 1995 0 0 Cerezo Osaka 2014 FIFA World Cup (standby)[12]
FW Masato Kudo (1990-05-06) 6 May 1990 4 2 Kashiwa Reysol v. New Zealand, 5 March 2014

Records

As of 18 November 2014
Statistics below are from matches which the Japan Football Association consider as official.[13][14][15]

Rosters

Managers

As of 18 November 2014[16]
Manager Period Record
Matches Won Draw Lost Win %
Masujiro Nishida 1923 2 0 0 2 0%
Goro Yamada 1925 2 0 0 2 0%
Vacant 1925 2 1 0 1 50%
Shigeyoshi Suzuki (1st) 1930 2 1 1 0 50%
Shigemaru Takenokoshi (1st) 1934 3 1 0 2 33.33%
Shigeyoshi Suzuki (2nd) 1936 2 1 1 0 50%
Shigemaru Takenokoshi (2nd) 1940 1 1 0 0 100%
Hirokazu Ninomiya 1951 3 1 1 1 33.33%
Shigemaru Takenokoshi (3rd) 1954–56 12 2 4 6 16.66%
Taizo Kawamoto 1958 2 0 0 2 0%
Shigemaru Takenokoshi (4th) 1958–59 12 4 2 6 33.33%
Vacant 1960 1 0 0 1 0%
Hidetoki Takahashi 1961–1962 14 3 2 9 21.43%
Ken Naganuma (1st) 1963–1969 31 18 7 6 58.06%
Shunichiro Okano 1970–1971 19 11 2 6 57.90%
Ken Naganuma (2nd) 1972–1976 42 16 6 20 38.09%
Hiroshi Ninomiya 1976–1978 27 6 6 15 22.22%
Yukio Shimomura 1979–1980 14 8 4 2 57.14%
Masashi Watanabe 1980 3 2 0 1 66.67%
Saburō Kawabuchi 1980–1981 10 3 2 5 30%
Takaji Mori 1981–1985 43 22 5 16 51.16%
Yoshinobu Ishii 1986–1987 17 11 2 4 64.70%
Kenzo Yokoyama 1988–1991 24 5 7 12 20.83%
Hans Ooft 1992–1993 27 16 7 4 59.25%
Falcão 1994 9 3 4 2 33.33%
Shu Kamo 1994–1997 46 23 10 13 50%
Takeshi Okada (1st) 1997–1998 15 5 4 6 33.33%
Philippe Troussier 1998–2002 50 23 16 11 46%
Zico 2002–2006 71 37 16 18 52.11%
Ivica Osim 2006–2007 20 13 5 3 65%
Takeshi Okada (2nd) 2007–2010 50 26 13 11 52%
Hiromi Hara (caretaker) 2010 2 2 0 0 100%
Alberto Zaccheroni 2010–2014 55 30 12 13 54.54%
Javier Aguirre 2014– 6 4 0 2 66.67%

Competitions

*Denotes draws includes knockout matches decided on penalty shootouts. Red border indicates that the tournament was hosted on home soil. Gold, silver, bronze backgrounds indicates 1st, 2nd and 3rd finishes respectively. Bold text indicates best finish in tournament.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup Finals Record Qualifications Record
Hosts / Year Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D L GS GA
1930 Did Not Enter - - - - - -
1934 - - - - - -
1938 Withdrew - - - - - -
1950 Banned - - - - - -
1954 Did Not Qualify 2 0 1 1 3 7
1958 Did Not Enter - - - - - -
1962 Did Not Qualify 2 0 0 2 1 4
1966 Did Not Enter - - - - - -
1970 Did Not Qualify 4 0 2 2 4 8
1974 4 1 0 3 5 4
1978 4 0 1 3 0 5
1982 4 2 0 2 4 2
1986 8 5 1 2 15 5
1990 6 2 3 1 7 3
1994 13 9 3 1 35 6
1998 Group Stage 31st 3 0 0 3 1 4 15 9 5 1 51 12
2002 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 5 3 - - - - - -
2006 Group Stage 28th 3 0 1 2 2 7 12 11 0 1 25 5
2010 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 4 2 14 8 4 2 23 9
2014 Group Stage 29th 3 0 1 2 2 6 14 8 3 3 30 8
2018 To be determined - - - - - -
2022 To be determined - - - - - -
Total Round of 16 5/20 17 4 4 9 14 22 102 54 24 24 203 78

AFC Asian Cup

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.