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Labor Party (Mexico)

Labor Party
Leader Alberto Anaya
Founded December 8, 1990 (1990-12-08)
Headquarters Mexico City
Ideology Left-wing nationalism
Democratic socialism
Anti-capitalism
Political position Left-Wing
National affiliation Broad Progressive Front
International affiliation Foro de São Paulo
Continental affiliation COPPPAL
Colours Red
Website
http://www.partidodeltrabajo.org.mx
Politics of Mexico
Political parties
Elections
National Executive Committee's offices of the Labor Party, located at Avenida Cuauhtemoc 47 in Mexico City.

The Labor Party (Spanish: Partido del Trabajo, PT) is a political party in Mexico. It was founded on December 8, 1990. The party is currently led by Alberto Anaya.

The PT's roots lay in a network of Maoist activists. The party first participated in federal elections in 1991, but it failed to win 1.5 percent of the vote (the amount necessary to be recognized as a national party). In 1994, Rosario Ybarra, the prominent activist, became the presidential candidate but later declined in favor of Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas.

In 1998 the PT allied with the larger Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) for the first time in the state of Zacatecas. In the 2000 elections, the party took part in the PRD-led Alliance for the Good of All. As part of the Alliance, it won 7 seats in the Chamber of Deputies and 1 seat in the Senate.

The PT ran separately from the PRD in the 2003 elections for the Chamber of Deputies. The party won 2.4 percent of the popular vote and 6 out of 500 seats in the Chamber of Deputies.

In November 2005, the PT endorsed the PRD's candidate for President, Andrés Manuel López Obrador for the July 2006 elections. In these elections the party won 12 out of 500 seats in the Chamber of Deputies and 3 out of 128 Senators.

In October 2006, the PT further allied itself with the PRD and the Convergence Party to form the Broad Progressive Front (FAP for its Spanish initials), which was granted the register by the Federal Electoral Institute.

PT lost its registration as a recognized national political party on September 3, 2015.[1]

Contents

  • Electoral history 1
    • Presidential elections 1.1
    • Congressional elections 1.2
      • Chamber of Deputies 1.2.1
      • Senate elections 1.2.2
  • References 2
  • External links 3

Electoral history

Presidential elections

Election year Candidate # votes % vote Result Note
1994 Cecilia Soto González 970,121 2.75 N Defeated
2000 support PRD Candidate; Coalition: Alliance for Mexico
2006 support PRD Candidate; Coalition: Coalition for the Good of All
2012 support PRD Candidate; Coalition: Progressive Movement

Congressional elections

Chamber of Deputies

Election year Constituency PR # of seats Position Presidency Note
votes % votes %
1994 896,426 2.7 909,251 2.7
10 / 500
Minority Ernesto Zedillo
1997 748,869 2.6 756,125 2.6
7 / 500
Minority Ernesto Zedillo
2000 see: Party of the Democratic Revolution
7 / 500
Minority Vicente Fox Coalition: Alliance for Mexico
2003 640,724 2.5 642,290 2.5
6 / 500
Minority Vicente Fox
2006 see: Party of the Democratic Revolution
12 / 500
Minority Felipe Calderón Coalition: Coalition for the Good of All
2009 1,264,210 3.7 1,268,125 3.7
13 / 500
Minority Felipe Calderón
2012 77,233 4 2,219,228 4.55
15 / 500
Minority Enrique Peña Nieto Coalition: Progressive Movement

Senate elections

Election year Constituency PR # of seats Position Presidency Note
votes % votes %
1994 977,072 2.9
0 / 128
Minority Ernesto Zedillo
1997 745,881 2.6
1 / 128
Minority Ernesto Zedillo
2000 see: Party of the Democratic Revolution
1 / 128
Minority Vicente Fox Coalition: Alliance for Mexico
2006 see: Party of the Democratic Revolution
0 / 128
Minority Felipe Calderón Coalition: Coalition for the Good of All
2012 2,339,923 4.9
4 / 128
Minority Enrique Peña Nieto Coalition: Progressive Movement

References

  1. ^ http://www2.ine.mx/archivos3/portal/historico/recursos/IFE-v2/DEPPP/DEPPP-ComiteRadioTelevision/DEPPP-ActasAcuerdos/DEPPP-acuerdos-docs/2015/INE-ACRT-33-2015.pdf

External links

  • (Spanish) Labor Party (Mexico) website
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