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Lebanon–United States relations

Lebanon – United States relations
Map indicating locations of Lebanon and USA

Lebanon

United States

Lebanon – United States relations are bilateral relations between Lebanon and the United States.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Diplomacy 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

The United States seeks to maintain its traditionally close ties with Lebanon, and to help preserve its independence, sovereignty, national unity, and territorial integrity. The United States, along with the international community, supports full implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1559, including the disarming of all militias and the deployment of the Lebanese Armed Forces throughout Lebanon. The United States believes that a peaceful, prosperous, and stable Lebanon can make an important contribution to comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

One measure of U.S. concern and involvement has been a program of relief, rehabilitation, and recovery that from 1975 through 2005 totaled more than $400 million in aid to Lebanon. For relief, recovery, rebuilding, and security in the wake of the demining and victims' assistance programs.

Over the years, the United States also has assisted the American University of Beirut (AUB) and the Lebanese American University (LAU) with budget support and student scholarships. Assistance also has been provided to the American Community School at Beirut (ACS) and the International College (IC).

In 1993, the U.S. resumed the International Military Education and Training program in Lebanon to help bolster the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF)—the country's only nonsectarian national institution—and reinforce the importance of civilian control of the military. Sales of excess defense articles (EDA) resumed in 1991 and have allowed the LAF to enhance both its transportation and communications capabilities, which were severely degraded during the civil war. Security assistance to both the LAF and the Internal Security Forces (ISF) increased significantly after the 2006 war, in order to support the democratically elected Government of Lebanon as it carries out the requirements of UNSCR 1701 and asserts its sovereignty over the whole of Lebanese territory.

On October 24, 2012, five days after the deadly car bombing in Beirut that killed Lebanese chief of intelligence Wissam Al-Hassan, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland announced that the American government will back the Lebanese political opposition coalition's call for a new cabinet free of Syrian influence as well as assist Lebanon in the investigation of the bombing.

Diplomacy

The U.S. Embassy operates in Awkar, Lebanon, as of 2015 the ambassador is David Hale. In September 1989, all American officials at the U.S. Embassy in Beirut were withdrawn, when safety and operation of the mission could not be guaranteed. A new U.S. Ambassador returned to Beirut in November 1990, and the Embassy has been continuously open since March 1991. In 1997, reflecting improvements in Lebanon's security climate, the United States lifted the ban it had imposed on American-citizen travel to Lebanon in 1985. The ban was replaced by a travel warning. Nonetheless, remaining security concerns continue to limit the size of the American staff and visitor access to the Embassy. American Citizen Services are available, and the Embassy resumed full nonimmigrant visa services in June 2003.

However, relations between the two countries soured briefly following accusations of double standards owing to American aid to Israel against Hezbollah insurgents during the 2006 war.

See also

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Department of State (Background Notes).[1]

External links

  • US State Department - History of Lebanon-U.S. relations
  • Embassy of Lebanon - Washington, DC
  • Embassy of U.S.A. - Beirut
  • Lebanon: Background and U.S. Policy Congressional Research Service
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