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List of U.S. state nicknames

 

List of U.S. state nicknames

Map of the United States showing the state nicknames as hogs. Lithograph by Mackwitz, St. Louis, 1884.

The following is a table of U.S. state nicknames, including officially adopted nicknames and other traditional nicknames for individual states and the district of the United States.

Contents

  • State nicknames 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

State nicknames

Current official state nicknames are highlighted in bold. A state nickname is not to be confused with an official state motto.
State Nickname(s)
 Alabama
(No official nickname)[1]
  • Cotton Plantation State[2]
  • Cotton State[3]
  • Heart of Dixie (used on license plates)[3][4][5]
  • Lizard State[2]
  • Yellowhammer State[3]
 Alaska
 Arizona
  • Apache State[8]
  • Aztec State[8]
  • Baby State (Because Arizona is the newest continental state in the Union)[8]
  • Copper State[8]
  • Grand Canyon State (currently used on license plates)[8][9]
  • Italy of America[8]
  • Sand Hill State[8]
  • Sunset State[8]
  • Sweetheart State (See below)[8]
  • Valentine State (Arizona gained statehood on February 14, 1912)[8]
 Arkansas
 California
 Colorado
 Connecticut
  • Constitution State (official, currently used on license plates)[23]
  • Nutmeg State[12]
  • Blue Law State[12]
  • Provisions State
  • Freestone State[12]
  • Land of Steady Habits[12]
 Delaware
  • Chemical Capital[24]
  • Corporate Capital (due to the state's business-friendly laws)[24]
  • Diamond State (allusion to the state flag)[24]
  • Blue Hen State or Blue Hen Chicken State[25]
  • The First State[24][26] (Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution; currently used on license plates)
  • Home of Tax Free Shopping[24]
  • New Sweden[24]
  • Peach State[24]
  • Small Wonder[24]
  • Uncle Sam's Pocket Handkerchief[24]
 Washington, D.C.
  • Nation's Capital[27]
  • DMV (nickname for the broader metropolitan area of Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia)[27]
 Florida
 Georgia
  • license plates)
  • [30] See also Atlanta Crackers: Origin of the name
  • Empire State of the South — Refers to economic leadership[30]
  • Yankee-land of the South: Similarly to the above nickname, "Yankee-land of the South" speaks to industrial and economic development in the south. This nickname may be used in a derogatory sense.[30]
  • Goober State — Refers to peanuts, the official state crop.[30]
  • State of Adventure (On highway welcome signs)
 Hawaii
  • Aloha State (officially the "popular" name,[31] currently used on license plates)[32]
  • Paradise
  • The Islands of Aloha
  • Paradise of the Pacific[32]
  • Pineapple State[32]
  • Rainbow State[33]
  • Youngest State[32]
  • 808 State (colloquial, refers to the state's area code.)[34][35]
 Idaho
  • Gem State[36]
  • Gem of the Mountains[37]
  • Little Ida[37]
  • Spud State[38]
  • Potatonia
  • Little Ida[37] (currently used on license plates)
 Illinois[39]
  • Land of Lincoln[40] (currently used on license plates)
  • Prairie State[40]
  • Corn State[40]
  • Inland Empire State
  • Garden of the West[40]
 Indiana
 Iowa
 Kansas
  • America's Bread Basket
  • Wheat State (previously used on license plates)
  • Home of Beautiful Women[43]
  • Central State[12]
  • Sunflower State[12]
 Kentucky
 Louisiana
  • Bayou State (previously used on license plates)
  • Child of the Mississippi
  • Creole State[12]
  • Fisherman's Paradise
  • Holland of America
  • Pelican State[12]
  • Sportsman's Paradise (currently used on license plates)
  • Sugar State
 Maine
 Maryland
  • America in Miniature[46]
  • Chesapeake State[47]
  • Cockade State[47]
  • Crab State
  • Free State[48]
  • Monumental State[47]
  • Old Line State[47]
  • Oyster State[47]
  • Queen State[47]
  • Terrapin State[49]
 Massachusetts
  • Baked Bean State[50]
  • Codfish State (formerly represented on license plates by a codfish)
  • The Bay State[50]
  • The Commonwealth
  • Old Colony State[51]
  • Pilgrim State[50]
  • The Spirit of America (currently used on license plates)
  • The People's Republic of Massachusetts (colloquial)
  • Taxachusetts (colloquial)[52][53][54][55][56]
 Michigan
  • The Great Lakes State (previously used on license plates)
  • Winter Water Wonderland (previously used on license plates)
  • the Wolverine State[57]
  • The World's Motor Capital
  • Mitten State
  • America's High Five
 Minnesota
  • Butter Country
  • Gopher State[12]
  • Land of 10,000 Lakes ("10,000 Lakes" currently used on license plates)
  • Land of Lakes
  • Land of Sky-Blue Waters
  • New England of the West[12]
  • North Star State
  • State of Hockey[58]
  • Vikings State
  • Bread and Butter State[12]
 Mississippi
  • Hospitality State (previously used on license plates)
  • Magnolia State
  • The South's Warmest Welcome
  • The Birthplace of America's Music (currently being used on license plates)
  • The Bayou State[12]
 Missouri
  • Bullion State[12]
  • Cave State
  • Gateway State
  • Bellwether State
  • Lead State
  • The Great Rivers State
  • The State of Misery (colloquial)
  • Ozark State
  • The Puke State[59]
  • Show-Me State (currently used on license plates)
 Montana
  • Big Sky Country (currently used on license plates)
  • The Last Best Place[60]
  • Treasure State (previously used on license plates)
 Nebraska
  • Beef State (previously used on license plates)
  • Cornhusker State (previously used on license plates)[61]
  • Tree Planter's State
  • Blackwater State[12]
  • The Good Life (as seen on state border signs)
 Nevada
 New Hampshire
 New Jersey
 New Mexico
  • Cactus State[64]
  • The Colorful State
  • Land of Enchantment[65] (currently used on license plates)
  • Land of Sunshine (predates "Land of Enchantment"; this earlier nickname highlighted the large percentage of sunshine received statewide)[64]
  • New Andalusia[64]
  • The Outer Space State
  • The Spanish State
 New York
 North Carolina
  North Dakota
 Ohio
 Oklahoma
 Oregon
  • Beaver State
  • Union State
  • Pacific Wonderland (previously used on license plates and currently available on an extra cost plate)[72]
  • Sunset State
  • Webfoot State[12]
 Pennsylvania
 Puerto Rico
  • Isla del Encanto ("Island of Enchantment") (currently used on license plates)
  • Borinquen (name given by indigenous people, the Tainos)[74]
  • The Shining Star of the Caribbean
  • Progress Island[75]
 Rhode Island
 South Carolina
 South Dakota
  • Artesian State[77]
  • Blizzard State[77]
  • Coyote State[77]
  • Land of Infinite Variety
  • The Mount Rushmore State[78] (officially adopted in 1980 in place of the former nickname of Sunshine State)[77]
  • Sunshine State[77]
 Tennessee
  • Big Bend State (refers to the Tennessee River)[79]
  • Butternut State (refers to the tan color of the uniforms worn by Tennessee soldiers in the American Civil War)[79]
  • Hog and Hominy State[79]
  • The Mother of Southwestern Statesmen[79]
  • Volunteer State[79] (currently used on license plates)
 Texas
  • Friendship State[80]
  • Lone Star State[25][80] (currently used on license plates)
  • Chili State
 Utah
 Vermont
 Virginia
  • Mother of Presidents[12]
  • Mother of States[12]
  • The Old Dominion[25]
  • The Commonwealth
 Washington
 West Virginia
  • Mountain State (previously used on license plates)
  • Almost Heaven
  • Panhandle State[12]
 Wisconsin
(No official nickname)[84]
  • Cheese State
  • Badger State[12]
  • America's Dairyland[85][86] (Also on license plates since a 1939 state law)[84]
  • The Copper State (historical)[87][88]
 Wyoming
  • Cowboy State
  • Equality State
  • Park State
  • Like No Place On Earth
  • Forever West (On highway welcome signs)

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ a b Introduction to Alabama, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  3. ^ a b c
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ a b c d e The Last Frontier State, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  7. ^
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Introduction to Arizona, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  9. ^ Ariz. HB 2549 Officially adopted by Arizona on February 14, 2011
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Introduction to Arkansas, US States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  11. ^ Arkansas § 1-4-106 - State nickname Retrieved Feb. 28, 2011
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w  
  13. ^ California Government Code Section 420.75 Retrieved Feb. 28, 2011
  14. ^
  15. ^ a b c d
  16. ^ a b
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^ Denver, Colorado
  20. ^
  21. ^ Colorado Ski Country USA history
  22. ^ Introduction to Colorado, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  23. ^ Conn. Stat. Sec. 3-110a, retrieved Nov. 4, 2013
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i Introduction to Delaware, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Barry Popik, Smoky City, barrypopik.com website, March 27, 2005
  26. ^ Delaware Code Title 29 Section 318 retrieved on February 28, 2011
  27. ^ a b Farhi, Paul. (2010, July 30). After initial obscurity, 'The DMV' nickname for Washington area picks up speed. Washington Post. Retrieved 20 December 2013.
  28. ^
  29. ^ a b c d e Introduction to Florida, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  30. ^ a b c d e
  31. ^ [1], Haw. Rev. Stat. § 5-7, retrieved Nov. 4, 2013
  32. ^ a b c d Introduction to Hawaii, 50 States.
  33. ^
  34. ^ 808 State Frequently Asked Questions: Where did 808 State get their name from?, 808 State Official Website.
  35. ^ 808 State Update, Talk Radio Hawaii
  36. ^
  37. ^ a b c Introduction to Idaho, 50 States.
  38. ^
  39. ^
  40. ^ a b c d Introduction to Illinois, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  41. ^ The unofficial sobriquet of the State of Indiana has given rise to the humorous constructions Hoosierana (the land of Hoosiers; see uses in Indiana Journalism Hall of Fame and by sports journalist Frank DeFord) and Hoosierstan (the place of Hoosiers).
  42. ^
  43. ^
  44. ^ a b c d Introduction to Kentucky, 50 States.
  45. ^
  46. ^ Judy Colbert, Off the Beaten Path: Maryland and Delaware, 8th ed., 2007, ISBN 978-0-7627-4418-3.
  47. ^ a b c d e f
  48. ^
  49. ^ Archives of Maryland Online
  50. ^ a b c Introduction to Massachusetts, 50 States, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  51. ^ Massachusetts (state, United States), Britannica Online, retrieved April 24, 2009.
  52. ^ Andrew Ryan, Report: 'Taxachusetts' label remains part of Massachusetts' past, Boston Globe, April 6, 2007.
  53. ^ Daniel J. Flynn, 'Taxachusetts' no more?, Forbes, October 22, 2008.
  54. ^ 'Taxachusetts' Voters May Eliminate State Income Tax, Fox News, October 7, 2008.
  55. ^ Michael D. Shear, Giuliani Backers Attack 'Taxachusetts Romney', The Washington Post, December 12, 2007.
  56. ^ Slate's Chatterbox: The Myth of 'Taxachusetts', National Public Radio, October 15, 2004.
  57. ^
  58. ^ Jess Myers, Hockey roots run deep in Minnesota, ESPN.com, February 10, 2004
  59. ^ [2] Riverfront Times, January 10, 2012
  60. ^ In Montana, a Popular Expression Is Taken Off the Endangered List New York Times, August 17, 2008; Retrieved February 28, 2011
  61. ^ [3], Nebraska Rev. Stat. § 90-101, retrieved Nov. 4, 2013
  62. ^ a b c
  63. ^ Dove kills ad calling New Jersey 'the Armpit of America', Los Angeles Times, 2014-03-04
  64. ^ a b c New Mexico Symbols, State Names, SHG Resources website, accessed July 7, 2008
  65. ^ New Mexico Revised Statutes, Sec. 12-3-4-N, retrieved Nov. 4, 2013
  66. ^ a b Introduction to North Carolina, 50 States, retrieved February 28, 2011.
  67. ^
  68. ^ Variety Vacationland Postcard Exhibit Retrieved February 28, 2011.
  69. ^
  70. ^
  71. ^
  72. ^
  73. ^
  74. ^
  75. ^ Progress Island U.S.A.
  76. ^
  77. ^ a b c d e South Dakota Symbols, State Names, SHG Resources website, accessed July 7, 2008
  78. ^ [4], S.D. Laws 1-6-16.5, retrieved Nov. 4, 2013
  79. ^ a b c d e Tennessee Symbols and Honors, in Tennessee Blue Book
  80. ^ a b
  81. ^
  82. ^
  83. ^
  84. ^ a b "Wisconsin State Symbols" in Wisconsin Blue Book 2005-2006, p. 966. Wisconsin has no Official nickname.
  85. ^
  86. ^
  87. ^
  88. ^

External links

  • Information about U.S. State Nicknames
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