Spin-doctor

"Spin doctor" redirects here. For the rock band, see Spin Doctors.

In public relations, spin is a form of propaganda, achieved through providing an interpretation of an event or campaign to persuade public opinion in favor or against a certain organization or public figure. While traditional public relations may also rely on creative presentation of the facts, "spin" often implies disingenuous, deceptive and/or highly manipulative tactics.[1]

Politicians are often accused by their opponents of claiming to be honest and seek the truth while using spin tactics to manipulate public opinion. Because of the frequent association between spin and press conferences (especially government press conferences), the room in which these take place is sometimes described as a spin room. A group of people who develop spin may be referred to as "spin doctors" who engage in "spin doctoring" for the person or group that hired them.[2]

History

Edward Bernays has been called the "Father of Spin". As Larry Tye describes in his book The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations, Bernays was able to help tobacco and alcohol companies use techniques to make certain behaviors more socially acceptable in the 20th-century US. Tye claims that Bernays was proud of his work as a propagandist.[3]

As information technology has increased dramatically since the end of the 20th century, commentators like Joe Trippi have advanced the theory that modern internet activism spells the end for political spin. By providing immediate counterpoint to every point a "spin doctor" can come up with, this theory suggests, the omnipresence of the internet in some societies will inevitably lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of spin.[4]

Techniques

The techniques of spin include:

For years businesses have used fake or misleading customer testimonials by editing/spinning a customers clients to reflect a much more satisfied experience than was actually the case. In 2009 the FTC updated their laws to include measures to prohibit this type of 'spinning' and have been enforcing these laws as of late. Additionally, over the past 5–6 years several companies have arisen that verify the authenticity of the testimonials businesses present on the marketing materials in an effort to convince one to become a customer.

Another spin technique involves a delay in the release of bad news so it can be hidden in the "shadow" of more important or favorable news or events.

Uses

  • Spin occurred when UK government press officer Jo Moore used the phrase It's now a very good day to get out anything we want to bury in an email sent on September 11, 2001, following the attacks on the World Trade Center.[7] When this email was reported in the press it caused widespread outrage for which Moore was forced to apologize.[8] She was later made to resign when it was claimed she had sent a similar email following the death of Princess Margaret.[9]
  • In the United States, public affairs dealing with US military contacts during the beginning of the War in Iraq used a spin tactic. Several parts of U.S. military wanted to hire public relations firms to send out fabricated or misleading information to get a rise in the public approval of the war. Some officials did not want to join information officers with public affairs officers for the fear of undermining the military's credibility. This form of spin uses the tactic of blowing small circumstances out of proportion to get a certain reaction from the public.[10]
  • In light of much criticism about the detention center for terrorism suspects in Guantanamo Bay, the Bush administration sent a planeload of prominent ex-military officers, many of whom were either lobbyists or consultants, or affiliated with prominent television networks or radio stations to the detention center for a carefully orchestrated tour. The field trip was an effort by the president's administration to influence the spin media would apply to their reports about the detention centers.[11]

Fictional spin doctors

See also

References

Bibliography

External links

  • Christian Science Monitor: The spin room – oily engine of the political meat grinder
  • Outfoxed: OUTFOXED: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism
  • Spin of the Day – Center for Media and Democracy
  • Spinwatch monitors spin and propaganda
  • SPIN (documentary): [1]
  • , January 6, 2002.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.