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The Bottle

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The Bottle

For the community in Auburn, Alabama, see The Bottle, Alabama.
"The Bottle"
B-side "The Bottle (Drunken mix)"
Released 1974
Format 7" single, 12" single
Recorded October 15, 1973
D&B Sound
(Silver Spring, Maryland)
Genre Soul, jazz-funk
Length 5:14
Label Strata-East
Writer(s) Gil Scott-Heron
Producer Perpis-Fall Music
Gil Scott-Heron chronology

"The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
(1971)
"The Bottle"
(1974)
"Johannesburg"
(1975)

"The Bottle" is a song by American soul artist Gil Scott-Heron and musician Brian Jackson, released in 1974 on Strata-East Records in the United States. It was later reissued during the mid-1980s on Champagne Records in the United Kingdom. "The Bottle" was written by Scott-Heron and produced by audio engineer Jose Williams, Jackson, and Scott-Heron. The song serves is a social commentary on alcohol abuse, and it features a Caribbean beat and notable flute solo by Jackson, with Scott-Heron playing keyboards.

The song was issued as the first and only single for Scott-Heron's and Jackson's album Winter in America (1974). It became an underground and cult hit upon its release, and the single peaked at number 15 on the R&B Singles Chart. Cited by music critics as the album's best recording, the commercial success of "The Bottle" helped lead to Jackson's and Scott-Heron's next recording contract with Arista Records. Similar to other compositions by Scott-Heron, the song has been sampled extensively by hip hop artists.

Composition

"The Bottle"
noicon
Cited by critics as its album's best recording, the song is a rhythmic social commentary on alcohol abuse.

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"The Bottle" is a social commentary on alcohol abuse with a Caribbean beat.[1] Scott-Heron wrote it after seeing men line up every day in front of a liquor store called the Log Cabin, bringing back their empty bottles to get a discount on their next purchase.[2] Scott-Heron said of his inspiration for the song in an interview for Newsnight, "I discovered one of them was an ex-physician, who'd been busted for abortions on young girls. There was an air traffic controller in the military - one day he sent two jets crashing into a mountain. He left work that day and never went back."[2]

The song also became a popular song played at parties at the time. French music critic Pierre Jean-Critin later described it as "an epic song ... whose infectious groove can still set dance floors alight over thirty years later."[1] The song's pop/dance sensibilities and social message engendered its appeal to listeners following its release as a single. Scott-Heron later said of the single's success and style, "Pop music doesn't necessarily have to be shit."[1]

Cited by critics and music writers as Winter in America's best recording, "The Bottle" also addresses problems of drug addiction, abortion, and incarceration, while featuring Jackson on flute and Scott-Heron on keyboards.[1][3] While its theme examines the plight of alcoholics and those who have to live with and cope with them, "The Bottle" became a concert favorite and one of Scott-Heron's most popular songs.[4]

Release and reception

"The Bottle" was released in 1974 as the only single for Winter in America. The song became an underground and cult hit upon its release.[5] Soon after, it also became one of Scott-Heron's most successful singles, as it reached the number 15 spot on the R&B Singles Chart.[3] The single's success helped lead to Jackson's and Scott-Heron's next recording contract with Arista Records, where they would enjoy more commercial success.[6]

"The Bottle" has been cited by critics as Winter in America's best recording.[7] Paul J. MacArthur of the Houston Press called it a "strong anti-alcohol rant with a funky bass hook and chilly flute fills."[7] Much like many of Scott-Heron's recordings, "The Bottle" has been sampled by several hip hop artists, including De La Soul and the Jungle Brothers.[8] "The Bottle" was later ranked number 92 on NME's list of The Top 150 Singles of All-Time and was included in Q magazine's 1010 Songs You Must Own! publication.[9]

Track listings and formats

These are the formats and track listings of the U.K. single releases of "The Bottle":[10][11]

Personnel

Charts

Billboard Music Charts (North America) – "The Bottle"[3]

  • 1974: Top R&B Singles – #15

Covers

Joe Bataan covered "The Bottle" for his 1975 album Afrofilipino, though slightly re-titled "The Bottle (La Botella)".[12]

Sample use

The information regarding sampling of "The Bottle" is adapted from TheBreaks.com[8]

Notes

References

External links

  • "Discogs
  • Song lyrics at Scott-Heron's website
  • YouTube
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